People

A short biography is available for each of the following researchers:

Professor Masooda Bano

Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford
Email: masooda.bano@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Dr Masooda Bano recently completed a DPhil at the University of Oxford on aid and cooperation in voluntary groups in Pakistan. She is currently a research associate at Queen Elizabeth House and a junior research fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford, and is undertaking research on madrasas in Pakistan. She is working with Richard Batley on non-state service provision and is also independently funded by a fellowship under the ESRC Non-Governmental Public Action Programme.

Masooda is a Research Associate on the following component: iiib. Faith-based service providers and their changing relationship with the state.

Professor Emeritus Richard Batley

International Development Department, School of Government and Society
Email: r.a.batley@bham.ac.uk

Professor Richard Batley is a member of the International Development Department of the School of Public Policy, University of Birmingham. He has undertaken research over the last 10 years on the new roles of government in post-liberalized economies, relations between governments and donors in new aid modalities (budget and sector-wide support), and non-state service provision in Africa and Asia funded by DFID. He is principal investigator of a project funded by the ESRC's Non-Governmental Public Action Programme on relations between government and non-state service providers in South Asia (click hereto find out more).

Richard is the coordinator of the following component: iiib. Faith-based service providers and their changing relationship with the state.

Dr Josef Boehle

School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion, University of Birmingham
Email: j.boehle@bham.ac.uk

Dr Josef Boehle is Research Fellow in Globalisation, Religion and Politics at the Department of Theology and Religion, University of Birmingham, and Coordinator of the UNESCO Chair in Interfaith Studies at the University of Birmingham. His current research focuses on Religions, Civil Society and International Institutions and he conducts research for the Religions and Development research programme at the University of Birmingham.

He received a postgraduate degree in Theology from the University of Tuebingen, Germany, in 1993 and his PhD from the University of Birmingham in 2001 for his thesis on Inter-religious Co-operation in a Global Age(excerpts of the thesis are published in the journal article 'Inter-religious Cooperation and Global Change: From a Clash of Civilisations to a Dialogue of Civilisations', in Pacifica Review: Peace, Security and Global Change, 14, (3), 2002.)

He helped to organise major conferences and summits addressing inter-religious, inter-cultural and inter-civilisational issues, including a Symposium at UNESCO headquarters in Paris on Unity in Diversity. Ethical and Spiritual Visions for the Worldin November 2000. He participated in the Millennium NGO Forum at the UN in May 2000, the Millennium World Peace Summit at the UN in August 2000, the annual meetings of the Academic Council on the United Nations System, and gave a presentation at the UN conference onInterfaith Cooperation for Peacein June 2005.

Josef is the researcher on the following component: ivb. Faith communities and international institutions.

Dr Tamsin Bradley

School of Languages and Area Studies, University of Portsmouth
Email: tamsin.bradley@port.ac.uk

Tamsin Bradley studied as an undergraduate and postgraduate at the School of Oriental and African Studies. She began in the Politics and Study of Religions departments specialising in South Asia. She then went on to a Masters in Social Anthropology of Development before returning to the Study of Religions for her PhD. Tamsin's current position is as an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow. A position she holds jointly in the department for Government and International Relations and Department for Applied Social Sciences London Metropolitan University. Her mentors are Professor Jeff Haynes (GIR) and Professor Eileen Okeefe (DASS). The fellowship forms part of the Non-governmental Public Action research programme, London School of Economics. Key publications include a monograph entitled Challenging the NGOs: Women, Religion and Western Dialogues in India(London & NY: IB Tauris, 2006), and a peer reviewed article 'Does Compassion Bring Results? A Critical Perspective on Faith and Development' in Culture and Religion 6(3) (2005).

Tamsin is a coordinator of the following component: ia. Relationships between religious values and development concepts and practices.

Dr Joe Devine

Department of Social and Policy Sciences, University of Bath
Email: j.devine@bath.ac.uk

Joe Devine is Head of the International Development Group in the Department of Economics and International Development, University of Bath. His main research interests lie in well-being, poverty and inequality, and since October 2002 he has been the Country Coordinator (Bangladesh) for the ESRC funded Wellbeing in Developing Countries Research Programme. This programme builds on an overarching interest in the cultural construction of poverty and its influence on how people then attempt to improve their livelihoods. To date this has allowed him to look at the everyday politics of civil society organisations such as NGOs and other community based organisations; the role of violence in the political process; and people's experience of the state and the wider political process in their daily lives. His interest in wellbeing will be continued with a focus on culture, values and wellbeing in Bangladesh and India, under the University of Birmingham DFID funded research programme on Religion and Development (2005-10). He has a particular geographical interest in South Asia where he has carried out research and short term consultancy work since 1989.

Joe is a coordinator of the following component: ib. Wellbeing and religion - questions of values and practices.

Dr Justina Dugbazah

NEPAD Agency, Midrand, South Africa

Justina Dugbazah obtained her PhD in international development from the University of Birmingham, UK. Justina has more than 12 years cumulative professional experience in policy development, research, program direction and management, capacity building, and gender and development issues.

Her special interests and expertise are in rural livelihood, poverty reduction strategies, migration, gender and empowerment, gender and health, and good governance.

Justina has worked in the public sector and also participated in international development and research projects with universities, women's groups, UN agencies and civil society organizations. She has organized and presented at many regional and international workshops and conferences on development issues, working closely with relevant stakeholders. Justina worked briefly with the World Health Organization (WHO) country office in Ghana, where she worked mainly on gender and health issues. She participated in the WHO funded project on Macroeconomic and Health Initiative, and served on the Government of Ghana/UN Millennium Project. Justina has also undertaken substantial desk-based research on various development topics, including linkages between gender and health, rural livelihood and micro-credit, gender and migration, and religions and development.

She has experience as a small group teacher and facilitator in social policy at Carleton University, Ottawa. She acts as an advisor to the newly formed Centre for Research, Gender and Development in Ghana. Justina is currently working as Project Manager for the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) Agency in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Justina worked as a Research Associate on the following components:

  • ia. Relationship between values, religious teaching and mainstream development concepts and practices
  • ic. Religion, ethics and attitudes towards corruption
  • iia. Religions, politics and governance.

Professor Surinder Jodhka

Centre for the Study of Social Systems, School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
Email: Jodhka@mail.jnu.ac.ind / ssjohdka@yahoo.com

Surinder S. Jodhka teaches Sociology at the Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) in New Delhi, India. Apart from his interest in the social and cultural dynamics of religious communities in contemporary India, he has also been working on the changing nature of caste identities and agrarian social structure. He has published extensively and has three books and over forty research papers to his credit.

Surinder is the India country team leader of the following components:

  • iia. Religions, politics and government
  • iiid. The role of faith communities in conflict transformation and long term development.

Dr Nida Kirmani

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan
Email: nidkirm@yahoo.com / nida.kirmani@lums.edu.pk

Nida Kirmani recently completed her PhD in Sociology from the University of Manchester. Her thesis, 'Questioning 'the Muslim Woman': the Narration of Multiple Boundaries in Zakir Nagar,' looked at the formation of religious identity in a majority-Muslim neighbourhood in Delhi. Nida also holds an MA in Development Studies also from the University of Manchester. Alongside her academic experience, Nida has worked with human rights organisations in the US, Egypt and in India. Her primary research interests are related to religion, gender and development in South Asia. Nida worked for RaD as a Research Fellow from 2007 to 2010, and jointly as a Research Policy Analyst with Islamic Relief from 2007 to 2009.?She is now?an Assistant Professor in Sociology at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), Pakistan.

Nida worked as a Research Fellow on the following components:

  • iib. The role of faith communities in contemporary social movements
  • iiia. Mapping the terrain: the activities of faith-based organisations in development.
  • iiic. The development activities, values and performance of FBOs and NGOs

Dr Robert Leurs

International Development Department, School of Government and Society,  University of Birmingham
Email: leursr@adf.bham.ac.uk

Dr Heather Marquette

International Development Department, School of Government and Society
Email: h.a.marquette@bham.ac.uk

Dr Heather Marquette has particular expertise in anti-corruption reforms and strategies, good governance, the transition to democracy and civic education. She has 6 years international experience in consultancy work, research and training in governance. She has worked as a consultant for several donors on corruption issues, and acts as an adviser on political systems and governance for the UK Department for International Development. Dr Marquette has undertaken substantial desk and primary research, including Utstein Group-funded work on donor strategies on corruption; UK government-funded research on the World Bank's anti-corruption programme; and comparative approaches to civic education.

Heather is a coordinator of the following components:

  • ic. Religion, ethics and attitudes towards corruption
  • iib. The role of faith communities in contemporary social movements.

Padmaja Nair

Independent consultant, India
Email: nair.padmaja@gmail.com

Ms Padmaja Nair is an independent consultant based in India. She has experience in urban planning and management and the drinking water supply and sanitation sectors, with focus on programme planning, evaluation and institutional issues. Over the last 6 years she has focused on research and training in both urban and rural livelihood issues, including research on livelihood security of the urban poor. She is undertaking research with Masooda Bano and Richard Batley on non-state service provision and is currently funded by the ESRC Non-Governmental Public Action Programme.

Padmaja is a Research Associate on the following component: iiib. Faith-based service providers and their changing relationship with the state.

Dr Insa Nolte

Department of African Studies and Anthropology, University of Birmingham
Email: m.i.nolte@bham.ac.uk

Insa Nolte is based at the Centre of West African Studies at the University of Birmingham. Her research centres on Yoruba history and ethno-nationalist politics in Nigeria. Insa has recently completed an ESRC-funded research project onThe Rise of Yoruba Nationalism: Exclusion, Identity and Youth in Nigeria, which focused on the politics of young men and women in the militant ethno-nationalist organisation Oodua Peoples' Congress, and was graded 'outstanding' (clickhereto find out more). Insa is currently working on the rise of Muslim leadership within the formerly strongly Christian-dominated Yoruba nationalist movement. In recent years, Insa has taught widely both at undergraduate and graduate level, and she has carried out short-term consultancy work for Cadbury Schweppes Plc, USAID, DfID and Winrock. Insa's recent publications include 'Ethnic Vigilantes and the State: The Oodua People's Congress in southwestern Nigeria',International Relations21 (2), forthcoming 2007; with K.N. Amherd, 'Religions (West Africa)' in D. Johnson et al. (eds), Historical Companion to Postcolonial Literatures, Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2005; and 'Identity and Violence: The Politics of Youth in Ijebu-Remo, Nigeria' in The Journal of Modern African Studies, 42 (1), 2004.

Insa is a coordinator of the following components:

  • ic. Religion, ethics and attitudes towards corruption
  • iia. Religions, politics and governance.

Professor Olakunle Odumosu

Nigerian Institute of Social and Economic Research, Ibadan
Email: olakunle.odumosu@yahoo.com

Professor Emeritus Carole Rakodi (RaD Director)

International Development Department, School of Government and Society
Email: c.rakodi@bham.ac.uk

Professor Carole Rakodi is Director of the programme. She is a social scientist and urban planner and has worked on development issues since the 1970s, including periods of employment in Zambia and Kenya; research into urban land, housing, poverty, and livelihoods in Zambia, Zimbabwe and Kenya; research on user views of health and urban water services in Ghana, Zimbabwe and India; and advisory work related to informal urban land, sustainable urban development, urban poverty, and gender. She is author of Harare: Inheriting a Settler-Colonial City: Change or Continuity?(1995) and numerous articles and book chapters, and editor of The Urban Challenge in Africa(1997), Building Sustainable Urban Settlements(2002) and Urban Livelihoods: A People-Centred Approach to Reducing Poverty(2002). Currently she is Director of Research in the International Development Department , University of Birmingham, where she teaches research methods and social analysis for development.

Carole is the coordinator of the following component: iiie. UK Muslim NGOs talking.

Dr Martin Rew

International Development Department, School of Government and Society
Email: RewMJ@adf.bham.ac.uk

Dr Antonia Simbine

Nigerian Institute of Social and Economic Research, Ibadan
Email: tsombe98@yahoo.com

Professor Gurharpal Singh (RaD Deputy Director)

Dean, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, School of Oriental and African Studies, London
Email: gs41@soas.ac.uk

Prof Gurharpal Singh is Deputy Director of the programme. He is a political scientist trained at the London School of Economics and has specialised on India politics since the early 1980s. His research interests include: ethnicity and ethnic conflict; religion and politics in South Asia; the Sikh daispora; multiculturalism; and political corruption. He is the author of Ethnic Conflict in India: A case-Study of Punjab, Region and Partition: Bengal, Punjab and the Partition of the Subcontinent(edited with Ian Talbot), Communism in Punjab up to 1967, Culture and Economy in the Indian Diaspora(edited with Bhikhu Parekh and Steve Vertovec), Governance in Multicultural Societies(edited with John Rex), and Sikhs in Britain: The Making of a Community (with D.S.Tatla). He is the Nadir Dinshaw Chair in Inter-religious Relations in the Department of Theology and Religion and teaches on the M.A. in Politics and Religion. Currently he is working on a volume on the partition of India.

Gurharpal is a coordinator of the following components:

  • iia. Religions, politics and governance
  • iiid. The role of faith communities in conflict transformation and long term development
  • iva. New forms of religious transnationalism and development.

Professor Emeritus Michael Taylor

Rev Professor Emeritus Michael Taylor
Emeritus Professor of Social Theology; Associate Member, Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, College of Arts and Law, University of Birmingham
Email: mhandamtaylor@btinternet.com

Michael Taylor is an ordained Christian minister in the Free Church tradition in England. He was Principal of a theological college in Manchester and taught theology and ethics in the University there for 15 years until 1985 before becoming Director of Christian Aid, the ecumenical aid and development charity of most of the British churches. In 1998 he became President of the Selly Oak Colleges and in 2000 Professor of Social Theology (now Emeritus) in the University of Birmingham. For 3 years from 2002-5 he was seconded to be Director of the World Faiths Development Dialogue set up by the then President of the World Bank and world faith leaders to encourage inter-faith co-operation on development. He was President of the Jubilee Debt Campaign in the UK. He chairs a number of development-related charities, and has published books on theology and social ethics including: Not Angels but Agencies - the Ecumenical Response to Poverty(1995) and Poverty and Christianity(2000).

Michael is the coordinator of the following component: iic. Faith communities and the development process in Nigeria and Tanzania.

Dr Emma Tomalin

Director of the Centre for Religion and Public Life, School of Theology and Religious Studies, University of Leeds
Email: e.tomalin@leeds.ac.uk

Emma Tomalin is a lecturer in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Leeds. She began her research career with an interest in the links between religion and environmentalism, and has published several articles in this area. More recently, she has broadened this focus to include consideration of this relationships between religions and international development, with a particular focus on the gendered dimension of this interaction. Recent fieldwork in Thailand (funded by the British Academy) has been concerned with the campaign for full ordination for women in Theravada Buddhism and women's empowerment in Thai society more broadly. She is currently also working on a project with the Higher Education Academy's Subject Centre for Philosophical and Religious Studies on the contribution of Theology and Religious Studies to Education for Sustainable Development (ESD).

Emma is a coordinator of the following components:

  • iib. The role of faith communities in contemporary social movements
  • iiia. Mapping the terrain: the activities of faith-based organisations in development
  • iiic. The development activities, values and performance of FBOs.

Professor Mohammad Waseem

Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan
Email: waseem@lums.edu.pk

Prof Mohammad Waseem is Chairman of International Relations Department, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad Pakistan. He has written on ethnic, Islamic, constitutional, electoral and sectarian politics of Pakistan. His books include:Politics and the State in Pakistan(1989), The 1993 Elections in Pakistan(1994), Strengthening Democracy in Pakistan[jointly with S. J. Burki] (2002) and Democratization in Pakistan(forthcoming). He also edited the book Electoral Reform in Pakistan(2002). Professor Waseem has been on the editorial boards of international academic journals Ethnicities(Bristol), Contemporary South Asia(Bradford) and International Studies(New Delhi).

Mohammad is the Pakistan country team leader of the following components:

  • iia. Religions, politics and governance
  • iiid. The role of faith communities in conflict transformation and long term development.

Dr Sarah White

Director of the Centre for Development Studies, Department of Social and Policy Sciences, University of Bath
Emal: s.c.white@bath.ac.uk

Sarah White is Director of the Centre for Development Studies at the University of Bath (2002-). She is member of the Management Team of WeD, the ESRC funded Research Group into Wellbeing in Developing Countries, 2002-2007. She is also a member of the WeD Bangladesh team. With Joe Devine, she holds a research grant into culture, values and wellbeing in Bangladesh and India, under the University of Birmingham DFID funded research programme on Religion and Development (2005-10). She is Unit of Assessment leader for the University of Bath's Development Studies RAE 2008 submission.

Sarah joined the University of Bath in 1999 after teaching at the universities of East Anglia and Edinburgh. A lecturer in the Sociology of Development, her main interest is in the ways that social identities, culture and relationships are implicated in development processes. She has worked as a short-term consultant to development agencies such as Oxfam, the Red Cross, Save the Children and DFID in the areas of gender and development, disaster preparedness and response, children's participation and reproductive health. Her PhD on gender and class in rural Bangladesh was published by Zed Books in 1992. In 1997 she published a further book, this time co-authored, on Theology and Development. More recent publications concern culture and wellbeing; race; and children's rights and participation.

Sarah is a coordinator of the following component: ib. Wellbeing and religion - questions of values and practices.