Law and Norms of Music Borrowing

Location
Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham
Category
Arts and Law, Lectures Talks and Workshops, Research
Dates
Monday 13th July 2015 (13:00-17:30)
Download the date to your calendar (.ics file)
Contact

Dr Chen Zhu

A Cross-Atlantic and Cross-disciplinary Roundtable Discussion of Music Copyright Law in Context

Organised by

  • Dr Chen Zhu (Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham)
  • Professor Paul Heald (College of Law, University of Illinois)

Supported by a BRIDGE Collaboration Seed Fund (with special thanks to the Music Department, University of Birmingham and Professor Lionel Bently, University of Cambridge for their kind advice)

Programme

  • 1.00-1.25 Arrival and Registration
  • 1.25-1.30 Welcome from the BLS

Session I: Music borrowing in legal and historical context

  • 1.30-1.50 Paul Heald (University of Illinois): The current development of music copyright law in the US
  • 1.50-2.20 Chen Zhu (University of Birmingham):  (Dis-)harmony and Harmonisation: Charting the European legal landscape of music copyright before and after ECJ’s Infopaq ruling (with further comments and elaboration from Lionel Bently, University of Cambridge, & Luke McDonagh, University of Cardiff)
  • 2.20-2.40 Ann Allen-Van Russell (Trinity Laban): Musical borrowing in the eighteenth-century: Efficiency, Education and Homage

2. 40-3.00 First Coffee/Tea Break

Session II. Reflecting on forensic musicology & music informatics

  • 3.00-3.20 Joe Bennett (Boston Conservatoire) Reflecting on Forensic Musicology
  • 3.20-3.40 Response from Guy Protheroe (Conductor, English Chamber Choir)
  • 3.40-4.00 Daniel Wolff (London City University) On music similarity from the perspective of music informatics

4.00-4.10 A mini-break

Session III. Musicians and performers’ perspective

  • 4.10-4.30 Ananay Aguilar (University of Cambridge): Law and norm of music performance: an overview
  • 4.30-4.50 Izzie Barrett (musician): A day in the life of an internationally active jazz musician and our precarious relationship with copyright

4.50-5.30 Open discussion & summary of critical issues identified in the roundtable