Dr Emma J Marchant

Birmingham Law School
Lecturer in International Criminal Law

Dr Marchant is a lecturer in international criminal law and international humanitarian law. She is an interdisciplinary researcher focussing on technological challenges to law during armed conflict. She is interested in international criminal law, international humanitarian law, transnational criminal law and criminal law more generally.

Qualifications

  • PhD Law, entitled: Know Your Enemy: Implications of Technology on the Intelligence Standard for Targeting under International Humanitarian Law, University of Birmingham
  • LLM International Law, Crime, Justice and Human Rights, University of Birmingham
  • LLB Law, University of Plymouth

Biography

Dr Marchant is a lecturer in international criminal law at the University of Birmingham. Prior to this lectureship she was a lecturer in law at Coventry University. She completed her PhD at the University of Birmingham under the supervision of Professor Robert Cryer and Dr Alexander Orakhelashvili in June 2020. She has previously held an ESRC Impact Acceleration Post-Doctoral Fellowship to develop impact from her PhD. This resulted in a policy briefing concerning the three-fold increase in the use of drones (unmanned aerial vehicles) by law enforcement in England and Wales. She has worked with several interdisciplinary research groups, including the Institute for Global Innovation and the Centre for Crime Justice and Policing, and engaged with both academics and practitioners. Her work has featured in the Journal of Conflict and Security Law.

Teaching

International Criminal Law, Criminal Law, Transnational Criminal Law, International Humanitarian Law

Postgraduate supervision

International Humanitarian Law, International Criminal Law
International law and global legal studies (to include conflicts, international economic law, International sale of goods, international trade law, transitional justice, law and development, international economic law, international criminal law)

Research

Research into contemporary issues in international humanitarian law, particularly focussing on information and intelligence during conflict. Recent research developed an intelligence standard in targeting given the development of modern surveillance technologies. The role and scope of the precautionary principle of international humanitarian law continues to be at the heart of my current research, looking at both defenders’ obligations and the challenges presented by misinformation, deception and infiltration by hostile parties within technological decision-making systems during conflict.

Publications