Lucia Antonia Dino Guida

Lucia Antonia Dino Guida

Department of Modern Languages
Doctoral researcher

Contact details

Phd title: A synchronic screenshot of ‘in-tune’ cultures – investigating song translation in Italian dubbed Animated Musical Comedies
Supervisor: Prof. Helen Abbott and Dr. Emma Tyler
PhD in Modern Languages (Translation)

Qualifications

  • BA in Modern Languages (English and French) at la Sapienza – Università di Roma (Rome, Italy), 2016.
  • MA in Modern Languages and Translation (English and French) at la Sapienza – Università di Roma (Rome, Italy), 2019.

Biography

I obtained my BA in Modern Languages cum laude at la Sapienza – Università di Roma in 2016, with a thesis on Shakespeare’s villains and their representation in the modern TV series House of Cards (2013). In 2019, I completed my MA in Modern Languages and Translation cum laude at la Sapienza – Università di Roma with a thesis consisting of my own Italian translation of the playtext used for the National Theatre adaptation of Frankenstein by Danny Boyle, and a critical commentary based on key translation and adaptation theory.

Currently, I am a PhD student at the University of Birmingham and my research focuses on investigating song translation in Italian dubbed Animated Musical Comedies.

Research

My research aims at providing the first sustained empirical investigation into translation strategies used in Italian dubbed Animated Musical Comedies from the mid-20th century to the present day. Through my work, I intend to establish a new interdisciplinary approach to analyse Italian translators’ activity as adapters, and the effect of performance on the dubbing process, specifically in terms of voice analysis.

The findings of my research will allow to answer two main research questions: How does translation mediate interactions between music, culture, text and performance? Can the translated text alter the nature and perception of the song and the film in which it is included?

As a result, my project will both enrich the rather overlooked field of song translation and offer a new translation-based perspective on ‘in-tune’ cultural interactions and their impact on international film music production.