Siân Lowri Griffiths

Siân Lowri Griffiths

School of Psychology
Research Fellow

Contact details

Address
School of Psychology
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

Lowri is a Research Fellow at the School of Psychology working with Professor Rachel Upthegrove on a suicide prevention impact case study, and is also working on projects investigating the recognition and management of depression in early psychosis. Lowri was awarded a PhD in December 2018, looking into the predictors of functional outcome in first episode psychosis. 

Qualifications

  • PhD Psychology (2018), University of Birmingham
  • MSc Clinical Psychology, Bangor University
  • BSc (Hons) Clinical & Health Psychology, University of Wales, Bangor

Biography

After completing her MSc with distinction in Clinical Psychology at Bangor University, Lowri started working at the University of Birmingham in 2008 as a Research Associate. She has previously worked on a multi-centre trial looking at the effectiveness of a new cognitive therapy to prevent harmful compliance with command hallucinations, and later on the NIHR SUPEREDEN study, which aimed to provide the evidence base to develop the 'next generation' of early intervention in psychosis services. Alongside this work, Lowri completed a PhD under the supervision of Professor Stephen Wood and Professor Max Birchwood (NIHR portfolio study: Predictors of Functional Outcome in first episode psychosis: 2012 - 2014; UKCRN ID: 14396). Since submitting her PhD, Lowri has worked as a Research Fellow on the PRONIA study – a large European-funded study to develop a prognostic tool to predict mental health-related disability in young people, and has also been the lead lecturer for the ‘Adult Neuropsychological Syndromes’ final year psychology module. Lowri has been collaborating with the local mental health trust and West Midlands police to develop suicide prevention training with Professor Rachel Upthegrove, and is researching depression in early psychosis.

Teaching

Previous module lead: Adult Neuropsychological Syndromes (Year 3 Module, School of Psychology).

Other Teaching Experience:

Intercalated BMedSci in Psychological Medicine and MBChB course (small group teaching); Postgraduate Diploma in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (‘Attachment Across the Lifespan’ workshop facilitation); ‘Development of Attachment Behaviour’ undergraduate module (small group teaching). Health and Social Care Foundation Degree, Oxford Brookes University (guest lecturer).

Research

Research interests

Youth mental health; social functioning in first episode psychosis; suicide prevention; depression in psychosis; social cognition and neurocognition; fMRI; cognitive behavioural therapy; command hallucinations.

Publications

Griffiths, S.L. & Birchwood, M. (2019). Editorial: Vulnerability to Psychosocial Disability in Psychosis. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences28(2): 140-145. https://doi.org/10.1017/S2045796018000495

Griffiths, S.L., Michail, M., Birchwood, M., (2012). Cognitive Theory and Therapy for Command Hallucinations. Journal of Experimental Psychopathology, 3(4): 537-551.

Conference Papers

S.L. Griffiths, R. Reniers, S. Wood & M. Birchwood (2018). The relationship between cognition and functional improvement in the context of a psychosocial intervention targeting social disability in first episode psychosis. Schizophrenia Research 44(1)

S.L. Griffiths, S. Wood, & M. Birchwood (2014). Social cognition and neurocognition as predictors of social and role functioning in first episode psychosis: a prospective follow-up study. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 8: 145-145.

M. Birchwood, E. Peters, T. Wykes, N. Tarrier, S. Lewis, G. Dunn, L. Davies, H. Lester, M. Michail, S. L. Griffiths (2012). A Multicentre, Randomised Controlled Trial of Cognitive Therapy to Prevent Harmful Compliance with Command Hallucinations. Schizophrenia Research. 136 (1): 153. (*Poster award finalist – S.L. Griffiths).

M. Birchwood, E. Peters, T. Wykes, N. Tarrier, S. Lewis, G. Dunn, L. Davies, H. Lester, M. Michail, S. L. Griffiths (2010). A Multicentre, Randomised Controlled Trial of Cognitive Therapy to Prevent Harmful Compliance with Command Hallucinations. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 4(1), 147.

S. L. Griffiths (May, 2008) Exploring the feasibility of Neurofeedback as a therapeutic tool. Proceedings of the British Psychological Society Welsh Branch Annual Student Conference, Bangor University.

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