Professor Ed Wilding BSc, MSc, PhD

Professor Ed Wilding

School of Psychology
Professor in Psychology
Head of the School of Psychology

Contact details

Ed Wilding studies the psychological and neural processes that support human long-term memory. His current research interests are in how we exert control over what we remember and what we forget. A newer and rather different line of research concerns how best to implement and evaluate intiatives that promote diversity and incusion.

Qualifications

  • BSc Psychology, University of Sheffield
  • MSc Cognitive Science, University of Edinburgh
  • PhD Cognitive Neuroscience, University of St Andrews

Biography

Prof Ed Wilding completed his PhD studying how the brain supports memory retrieval at the University of St Andrews between 1993 and 1996. This was followed by Medical Research Council fellowships at the University of Oxford for the next three years. He moved to Cardiff University in 1999, was promoted to Professor in 2010, and served as Head of School of Psychology from 2012 to 2015. After four years at the University of Nottingham, which included 2 years as associate pro-vice chancellor with responsibility for the graduate school and research career development, he joined the University of Birmingham as Head of Psychology in 2019

Postgraduate supervision

I am happy to talk to students about postgraduate supervision starting in fall 2020. I am currently part of supervisory teams for 5 students who are based at the University of Nottingham.

Research

Memory retrieval, metacognition, brain imaging

Other activities

Member of:

  • STEMM-CHANGE University of Nottingham Diversity and Inclusion Initiative
  • BBSRC Skills and Careers Strategy Committee
  • Wellcome Trust Basic Science Fellowships Committee

Publications

2019

Williams, A.N. & Wilding, E.L. On the sensitivity of event-related potentials to retrieval mode. Brain & Cognition, 135, 103580.

2018

Evans, L.H. & Wilding, E.L. On the sensitivity of event-related fields to recollection and familiarity. Brain and Cognition. 126, 33-39.

2017

Zawadzka, K., Hanzcakowski, M. & Wilding, E.L (2017). Late consequences of early selection: when retrieval monitoring fails. Journal of Memory and Language. 92, 114-127.

Doidge, A., Evans, L.H., Herron, J.E. & Wilding, E.L. (2017). Separating content-specific retrieval from post-retrieval processing. Cortex. 86, 1-10.

2016

Herron, J.E., Evans, L.H. & Wilding, E.L. (2016). Electrophysiological evidence for flexible goal-directed cue processing during episodic retrieval. NeuroImage. 132, 24-31.

Williams, A.N., Evans, L.H., Herron, J.E. & Wilding, E.L. (2016). On the antecedents of an electrophysiological signature of retrieval mode. PLoS One. 11(12): e0167574.

2015

Evans, L.H., Herron, J.E. & Wilding, E.L. (2015). Real-time neural evidence for task-set inertia. Psychological Science. 26, 284-290.

Evans, L.H., Williams, A.N. & Wilding, E.L. (2015). Electrophysiological evidence for retrieval mode immediately after a task switch. NeuroImage, 108, 435-440.