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HSMC Academic Development Day – Patient and Public Involvement in the new NHS- Healthwatch, STP's and beyond

Location
Courtyard Room, Park House, University of Birmigham
Category
Social Sciences
Dates
Tuesday 31st October 2017 (12:00-14:00)
Download the date to your calendar (.ics file)
Contact

Karen Newbigging K.V.Newbigging@bham.ac.uk or Iestyn Williams I.P.Williams@bham.ac.uk

To book your place please contact James Liddiard on J.Liddiard@bham.ac.uk

Speaker: Professor Graham Martin of the University of Leicester

In this seminar Professor Martin will present findings from two recent, linked studies of patient and public involvement (PPI) in the National Health Service, and in particular insights into the form and function of PPI mechanisms that have emerged following the 2012 Health and Social Care Act, and the formulation of plans to realise the ambitions of the Five Year Forward view.

The first study (based on 31 interviews with Healthwatch personnel in an English region) examines the emerging place of Healthwatch organisations in local health and social care economies, and the challenges and opportunities that face them as they seek to present themselves as a key conduit for patient and public voice in an increasingly complex and crowded system and PPI ‘marketplace’.

The second study (based on two ethnographic case studies) looks specifically at the role of PPI in regional healthcare ‘transformation’ programmes. While this study found an apparently prominent and vocal place for PPI in the realisation of such plans, the findings also highlight how the composition of the patient and public representatives involved in the process, together with formal constraints and informal influences on what was sayable in programme forums, could result in a very particular (and relatively acquiescent) public contribution.

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