Dr Jennifer Arnold

Department of Modern Languages
Research Fellow

Contact details

Address
Ashley Building
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

I am currently working as Research Fellow on the project ‘Inner and Outer Exile in Fascist Germany and Spain’. My main research interests are the theory and practice of literary translation, the reception of translated fiction, particularly Spanish and Catalan, in the UK market with a focus on reader responses, and the perception of national and cultural identity through translation.

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Qualifications

  • PhD Hispanic Studies & Translation Studies (2017) (Birmingham)
  • MA Translation Studies (2010) (Birmingham)
  • BA Hons Hispanic Studies, First Class (2008) (Birmingham)

Biography

After completing an undergraduate degree at Birmingham, I remained at the university for both my MA and my PhD, which I completed in 2017 before beginning in my current position. I worked as a teaching assistant throughout my postgraduate study, contributing to a range of modules within Hispanic Studies, Catalan Studies and Translation studies.

Alongside my academic career, I also translate professionally, with a particular interest in literary and academic translation. In 2017 I was awarded the Emerging Translator Mentorship by the Writer Centre Norwich for Catalan.

Teaching

Teaching I have taught on a range of modules including Spanish language and translation, core literature, Catalan language and translation, Catalan culture, and translation theory and practice. I have also taught on the MA in Translation Studies and continue to tutor on the distance MA.

Research

I am currently researching and preparing an anthology of translated exile writings from Nazi Germany and Francoist Spain, including a selection of fictional and non-fictional texts from a wide range of genres including novels, short stories, poetry, essays and diaries. My doctoral research focussed on the translation and reception of Catalan literature within the UK market, with a particular focus on reader responses using both online readers and reading groups.

I developed a methodology which offers a way of assessing, not only reader responses to individual texts, but also responses to translated literature more generally, and the way in which decisions taken throughout the translation process can impact upon the reception of a work. My future research projects will build upon this methodology in order to challenge perceptions of Anglophone reader’s attitudes towards translated fiction.