Sophie Gallop

Sophie Gallop

Birmingham Law School
Postgraduate Teaching Associate

Contact details

Telephone
0121 414
Fax
0121 414 3585
Email
sxg454@bham.ac.uk
Address
Birmingham Law School
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

Title of thesis: Torture and the Exhaustion of Domestic Remedies Rule, under the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

Supervisors: Dr Rosa Freedman and Dr Julian Lonbay

Qualifications

  • LLB (Hon.) (University of Warwick)
  • LLM (University of Bristol)

Biography

I completed my LLB, with honours, at the University of Warwick in 2012, and then my LLM at the University of Bristol in 2013. I additionally undertook work as a Legal Assistant during my studies. The LLM was focused on international law, and my dissertation focused on the effects of the exhaustion of domestic remedies rule on individual applications alleging torture to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights. During completion of the LLM, I additionally took part in the John Davis project.

After the completion of my LLM, I was offered a position as a Visiting Lecturer at the University of The Gambia, through the Bristol Human Rights Implementation Centre. At the University of the Gambia, I lectured Contract Law, Tort Law and Legal Ethics. Additionally I was a member of the University of The Gambia Working Group on Academic Affairs engaged in improving the legal curriculum and working practices at the University, and a personal tutor to a number of first year students.

Currently I am a teaching associate and PhD candidate at the University of Birmingham. My doctoral research is focused on the exhaustion of domestic remedies in the context of individual applications of torture to the Human Rights Committee, under the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

Doctoral research

PhD title
Torture and the Exhaustion of Domestic Remedies Rule, under the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
Supervisor
Dr Julian Lonbay
Course
Law PhD / PhD by Distance Learning / MPhil / MJur

Research

The doctoral research project looks to analyse the effects of the exhaustion of domestic remedies rule on individual applications to the Human Rights Committee alleging torture. These investigations will be undertaken in light of the link between serious incidents of human rights abuses, and incidents of non-independent judiciaries.

Publications

Media articles:

Conference papers:

  • S. Gallop (2016) ‘The transition to true judicial independence and impartiality in Armenia: is the legacy of the Soviet Union being overcome in practice?’ Law and Society Association 2016, New Orleans.
  • S. Gallop (2015) 'Judicial Independence: Tenure and Fiscal Corruption' Postgraduate Legal Research Conference 2015, Queen Mary University of London.

Poster presentations:

  • S. Gallop (2015) 'Judicial Independence: Tenure and Fiscal Corruption' Society of Legal Scholars Conference 2015, University of York 

Public seminars:

  • S. Gallop (2014) Presentation to Rene Cassin “The Exhaustion of Domestic Remedies in the Context of State Sovereignty”, Human Rights Seminar Series (invited and funded speaker)

Forthcoming:

  • S. Gallop (2015) 'The exhaustion of domestic remedies rule: a realistic demand for individuals who have suffered torture at the hands of state actors?' Bristol Law Review (forthcoming).