Year Two Modules

Compulsory Modules 

Drama and Media Writing

Drama and Media Writing will inspire you to experiment with content, form and technique in dramatic writing for stage and screen and to reflect in a focussed way on your own writing process. You will engage with individual media works within their scheduled and marketed contexts and share work in progress with fellow students.

Editing

Editing introduces the theory and practice of editing through a combination of contextualising lecture-workshops and a substantial practical editing project. Students will gain a structured overview of issues relating to the editing of literary / media texts from self-editing (editing as a creative strategy, building on the students’ creative writing to date) and editing as a mentoring strategy, to editing as a professional activity involving different types and levels of expertise. Students will be introduced to both generic and genre / media specific editing techniques and will be given the opportunity to hone their ability to make realistic (critical and aesthetic) editorial judgments through a practical editing project, involving the collaborative selection, text editing / proof-reading and in house publication of an anthology of work by fellow students.

Poetry and Prose Writing

Poetry and Prose Writing will inspire you to experiment with content, form and technique in prose and poetry and to reflect in a focussed way on your own writing process. You will study up to date writing models and share work in progress with fellow students.

Optional Modules (may include) 

Histories of Literature (students choose 2)  

  • Songs and Sonnets: English Poetry from Wyatt to Donne

  • The Canterbury Tales 

  • Popular Fiction before the Novel

  • Epic Ambitions

  • Stories of the Novel

  • Writing the Restoration

  • Fin de Siecle

  • Romantics and Romanticisms

  • Victorian Literature

  • Aspects of Modernism 

  • New World Orders? Literature after 1945

  • Twenty-First-Century Literature

Themes in Literature (students choose 1)

  • Colonial/Postcolonial 

  • Digital Futures

  • Enterprising English 

  • Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies 

  • Rags and Riches: Wealth and Poverty in American Literature and Culture 

  • Shakespeare's Sisters

  • The Gothic

  • The Use of Genre: Nefarious Plots, Cheap Thrills and the Search for Meaning

  • Tragedy

  • Utopia/Dystopia

  • Rude Writing: Satire and its Targets

or 

Shakespeare: Elizabethan and Jacobean