Eyewitness Identification from a Different Angle

Location
online event
Dates
Tuesday 16 November 2021 (18:00-19:30)
Eyewitness identification

Criminal identification in many countries consists of using static photographs, shown from the shoulders up, facing forward. Mistaken identification from lineups is a leading cause of miscarriages of justice.

Accuracy can be significantly increased, however, by allowing people interact and rotate the faces according to the latest research. Interactivity has also been shown to reduce racial bias; the most common factor associated with cases of mistaken identification is the witness being of a different race than the culprit. These new techniques are low-cost to implement and can be made available to test in field contexts with law enforcement.

In a series of short online videos, experts will discuss the role of interactivity in face recognition accuracy, including its role in reducing racial bias. On demand talks will be hosted on the ESRC Festival of Social Science webpage and available throughout the month of November. These videos will be complemented by a live ‘Ask Me Anything' zoom event. The session will be moderated by Distinguished Professor John Wixted from the University of California, San Diego, a world-leading memory expert.

This event is part of the ESRC Festival of Social Sciences. Spanning the month of November a range of interactive virtual and physical events will be free and open to the public - find out more about our other events as we discuss Our Changing World!

'Ask Me Anything' speakers:

  • Professor Carolyn Semmler, University of Adelaide, AU
  • Professor Laura Mickes, University of Bristol, UK
  • Dr Karen Amendola, National Police Foundation, US
  • Dr David White, University of New South Wales, AU
  • Professor William Wells, Sam Houston State University, US
  • Dr Anna Bobak, Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, UK
  • Wayne Collins, VIPER, UK
  • Mick Gibbin, Promat Envision, UK
  • Professor Alice O’Toole, University of Dallas, Texas
  • Professor Tom Albright
  • Professor David White, University of New South Wales
  • Professor John Wixted

On demand talks and speakers

  • Interactivity boosts forensic face matching accuracy for superior and typical recognizers (Dr Harriet Smith, Nottingham Trent University)
  • Children’s expressions of certainty predict performance on interactive lineups (Dr Melissa Colloff, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham)
  • Interactivity increases discrimination accuracy in own and other race lineup identifications (Prof Chris Meissner, Department of Psychology, Iowa State University)
  • Interactive lineups outperform UK video lineups and US static simultaneous lineups (Marlene Meyer, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham)
  • Enabling witnesses to reinstatement perpetrator pose with interactive lineups boosts discrimination accuracy in lineups (Prof Heather Flowe, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham.

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