MA/Diploma/Certificate Holocaust and Genocide

MA Holocaust and Genocide

This programme will be available for entry in September 2015.

Co-taught by staff in History, Modern Languages and Theology and Religion, this interdisciplinary programme will immerse you in past and present debates about researching, remembering and commemorating the Holocaust and other genocides. You have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives with a choice of optional modules - some which have a more traditional, historical focus and others which examine the cultural, social, political and religious afterlife of the Holocaust and other genocides.

Course fact file

Type of Course: Taught

Study Options: Full time, part time

Duration: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time; Diploma - 8 months full-time, 16 months part-time; Certificate - 4 months full-time, 8 months part-time

Start date: September 2015

Details

We are able to offer a unique combination of expertise in the study of the Holocaust and of genocide across a variety of disciplines, including historical studies, conflict and war studies, memory studies, literary studies, translation studies, and film studies.

In addition to taking modules directly related to the Holocaust and/or genocide, you therefore also have the opportunity to take alternative disciplinary approaches and study modules that are relevant to, but not directly related to, the topic.

All students will take two core modules:

  • Research Skills in the Study of Holocaust and Genocide: Methodologies and Sources
  • Holocaust and Genocide: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

MA students will also take an additional module: Dissertation Preparation and Guided Reading (Holocaust and Genocide). See below for full details of core modules.

Certificate students will take one optional module, while Diploma and MA students will take three optional modules, from a wide range of related Masters-level options within the College of Arts and Law, as well as within the Department of Political Science and International Studies (College of Social Sciences).

Certificate students are advised to take a module which directly relates to the study of Holocaust and/or genocide, chosen in consultation with the programme leader. MA and Diploma students also have the option to choose up to two of their modules from the wider College; again, this should be done in consultation with the programme leader.

MA students will complete the programme with a dissertation – this can either be a written or placement-based dissertation. If you choose to complete a written dissertation its length will be 15,000 words.

Modules

All students will take the following core modules:

Research Skills in the Study of Holocaust and Genocide: Methodologies and Sources

This module introduces you to the extensive and varied methodological challenges in studying and carrying out research on the Holocaust and/or genocide. Particular attention is paid to: the multi-and interdisciplinary character of studying the Holocaust and genocide and the range of disciplinary and theoretical interpretive frameworks that can be adopted; the methodological challenges posed by the nature of the sources available (in some cases, by the absence, or fragmented nature, of those sources); the importance of context – local, national and transnational in determining interpretations of, and responses to, Holocaust and genocide; and the complexities of remembering, representing and instrumentalising Holocaust and genocide.

The module consists of a series of seminars/workshops by academics working in these fields, reflecting on the particular methodological challenges they have confronted in their research and/or teaching specialisms, with reference to specific examples and case studies focusing on key generic research sources.

Holocaust and Genocide: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

This module explores the complexities and challenges of defining and studying the ‘Holocaust’ and ‘genocide’, both on their own terms and comparatively. Attention will be paid to ongoing disputes over what constitutes appropriate terminology in this subject area. This discussion will be contextualised within the emerging and developing fields of Holocaust studies and genocide studies and the complex and contested historiography of ‘Holocaust’, ‘genocide’ and their interrelationship.

Topics covered may include: ‘the politics of uniqueness’; interpretations of the Holocaust as ‘a mosaic of victims’; the relationship between Holocaust/genocide and war; the complexities of categories such as ‘victims, perpetrators and bystanders’; the significance of gender (e.g., ‘gendercide’); genocide and ‘prevention’; prosecuting war crimes and crimes against humanity; different manifestations of denial; and the growing phenomena of memorial museums and the controversies surrounding ‘exhibiting’ atrocity.

MA students will also take two additional core modules:

Dissertation Preparation and Guided Reading (Holocaust and Genocide)

This module is designed to aid your planning and research for your dissertation. You will be supported to develop the relevant skills and produce a structured framework in the form of the preparation of a research proposal and literature review. During the course of the module you will also become familiar with a range of bibliographic aids for locating relevant primary and secondary sources.

Dissertation or Placement-based Dissertation

If you choose to complete a written dissertation, this will be a substantial and sustained investigation of an aspect of the Holocaust and/or genocide in history and/or memory, culminating in a 15,000-word thesis.

The placement-based dissertation is ideal for those who have begun careers and are returning to study after time in employment, or those who are aiming to enhance their employability by obtaining (further) experience within related professional contexts. The Placement-based Dissertation offers a more applied, contextualised approach to independent research than the more traditional dissertation route. It combines a placement at a relevant institution or organisation (e.g., a museum or NGO) with the production of either a 10,000-word dissertation critically analysing and evaluating reflecting on an aspect of the approach and/or work of the institution hosting the placement, or a report or piece of relevant research, or another form of media output for the placement host (such as a website).

Fees and funding

 We charge an annual tuition fee. Fees for 2015/16 are as follows:

MA 

  • Home/EU: £6,210 full-time; £3,105 part-time
  • Overseas: £14,140 full-time 

Diploma 

  • Home/EU: £4,140 full-time; £2,070 part-time
  • Overseas: £14,140 full-time 

Certificate 

  • Home/EU: £2,070 full-time or part-time
  • Overseas: £7,070 full-time 

For part-time students, the above fee quoted is for year one only and tuition fees will also be payable in year two of your programme. 

Tuition fees can either be paid in full or by instalments. Learn more about postgraduate tuition fees and funding

Eligibility for Home/EU or Overseas fees can be verified with Admissions. Learn more about fees for international students.

Scholarships and studentships

Scholarships to cover fees and/or maintenance costs may be available. To discover whether you are eligible for any award across the University, and to start your funding application, please visit the University's Postgraduate Funding Database.

International students can often gain funding through overseas research scholarships, Commonwealth scholarships or their home government.

University of Birmingham graduates may be entitled to a fee reduction through the College of Arts and Law Alumni Bursary scheme.

Entry requirements

Learn more about entry requirements

International students

Academic requirements

We accept a range of qualifications; our country pages show you what qualifications we accept from your country.

English language requirements

You can satisfy our English language requirements in two ways:

How to apply

Before you make your application

You may wish to register your interest with us to receive regular news and updates on postgraduate life within this Department and the wider University.

Making your application

This programme will be open for applications in autumn 2014, for entry in September 2015. For more information, or to register your interest, please contact Dr Isabel Wollaston at i.l.wollaston@bham.ac.uk.

Learning and teaching

The Research Skills module is taught in an intensive three-day block, to be supported by self-directed e-learning. The dissertation preparation module is taught via a combination of seminars and individual supervision sessions, while other modules are generally taught via weekly seminars over ten weeks.

You will be given opportunities to come into contact with experts working in their subject areas, and begin networking with such experts and your postgraduate peers, through activities such as our annual colloquium on Holocaust and genocide.

You will also become part of, and contribute to, the vibrant international community of the College of Arts and Law Graduate School, which offers dedicated research resources and a supportive working environment. Our team of academic and operational staff are on hand to offer support and advice to all postgraduate students within the College.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support through the English for International Students Unit (EISU).

Employability

This programme will enable you to develop your independent learning skills, develop your written and oral communication and show evidence of these to specialist and non-specialist, practitioner and academic audiences.

The University of Birmingham has been ranked 8th in the UK and 60th in the world for post-qualification employability in the latest global survey of universities commissioned by the International Herald Tribune.

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by the employability skills training offered through the College of Arts and Law Graduate School.

Birmingham’s Theology graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills including: familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on statistical research.

Over the past five years, over 92% of our postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Many of our graduates go into careers in churches of various denominations. For those in further study, teacher training courses remain a popular choice. Other students use their transferable skills in a range of employment sectors, including local government, education and charities. Employers that our graduates have gone on to work for include: British Council; Church of England; Institute of Education; International Greek New Testament Project; Quaker Homeless Action; Queens Ecumenical Theological College; and University of Birmingham.