MA/Diploma/Certificate Holocaust and Genocide

Start date
September
Duration
1 year full-time; 2 years part-time
Course Type
Postgraduate, Taught
Fees
Annual tuition fees for 2020/21:
UK / EU: £9,250 full-time
International: £18,450 full-time
More details.

Immerse yourself in past and present debates about researching, remembering and commemorating the Holocaust and other genocides.

Co-taught by staff in History, Modern Languages and Theology and Religion, this interdisciplinary programme is aimed at recent graduates, teachers or professionals with NGO’s who want to specialise in this thought provoking area.

You have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives with a choice of optional modules - some which have a more traditional, historical focus and others which examine the cultural, social, political and religious afterlife of the Holocaust and other genocides.

We are able to offer a unique combination of expertise in the study of the Holocaust and of genocide across a variety of disciplines, including historical studies, conflict and war studies, memory studies, literary studies, translation studies, and film studies.

In addition to taking modules directly related to the Holocaust and/or genocide, you therefore also have the opportunity to take alternative disciplinary approaches and study modules that are relevant to, but not directly related to, the topic.

 

College of Arts and Law postgraduate scholarships available

The College of Arts and Law is offering a range of scholarships for our postgraduate taught and research programmes to ensure that the very best talent is nurtured and supported.

Learn more about our scholarships

I believe that the lack of understanding and education on the consequences of discrimination by three post war generations has contributed to the genocides since the Second World War. Holocaust Education is relevant in today’s world. It is vital that lessons are learned from the catastrophic events of the past to prevent future genocides.

Kitty Hart-Moxon, Holocaust Survivor and Honorary Graduate

Why Study this Course?

  • Taught by experts – the departments contributing to this course are home to outstanding academic staff who are leading in their fields and will support you throughout your time at Birmingham.
  • Small classes – teaching on the masters-level modules involves mainly small-group seminars allowing you to have a focused discussion about the learning materials.
  • Friendly and relaxed atmosphere – staff are always happy to talk through work and provide additional feedback on academic performance.
  • Be a part of an active postgraduate community – you will join a lively and stimulating community where you can contribute to on-going research activities, including research seminars, events, workshops, reading groups and conferences throughout the year.
  • Access to academic support services – as a postgraduate student you will have access to services such as the Academic Writing Advisory Service and the Bank of Assessed Work which will aid your transition from undergraduate to postgraduate level, or back into academia after a time away. 

The postgraduate experience

The College of Arts and Law offers excellent support to its postgraduates, from libraries and research spaces, to careers support and funding opportunities. Learn more about your postgraduate experience.

Modules

Core modules

All students will take the following core modules:

Research Skills in the Study of Holocaust and Genocide: Methodologies and Sources

This module introduces you to both generic and subject-specific research skills. Generic study skills and research methods covered in the seminars may include academic writing skills (at Masters level), what is good research and how to choose a research topic, research ethics, research methodologies and fieldwork, working in archives and working with social media.

Subject specific sessions will stress the multi-and interdisciplinary character of studying the Holocaust and genocide and the diversity of approaches and disciplinary and theoretical interpretive frameworks that can be adopted. These sessions will explore some of the methodological challenges posed by the nature of the sources available (in some cases, by the absence, or fragmented nature, of those sources). Additional topics explored may include the importance of context – local, national and transnational - in determining interpretations of, and responses to, Holocaust and genocide; and the complexities of remembering, representing and memorializing atrocity, ‘dark tourism’, Holocaust and genocide. The teaching of the module is delivered in a two-day intensive block.
Assessment: 3500-word essay (90%) + completion and submission of a Dissertation Choice Form (10%)

Holocaust and Genocide: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives

This module explores the complexities and challenges of defining and studying the ‘Holocaust’ and ‘genocide’, both on their own terms and comparatively. Attention will be paid to ongoing disputes over what constitutes appropriate terminology in this subject area. This discussion will be contextualised within the emerging and developing fields of Holocaust studies and genocide studies and the complex and contested historiography of ‘Holocaust’, ‘genocide’ and their interrelationship.

Topics covered may include: ‘the politics of uniqueness’; interpretations of the Holocaust as ‘a mosaic of victims’; the relationship between Holocaust/genocide and war; the complexities of categories such as ‘victims, perpetrators and bystanders’; the significance of gender (e.g., ‘gendercide’); genocide and ‘prevention’; prosecuting war crimes and crimes against humanity; different manifestations of denial; and the growing phenomena of memorial museums and the controversies surrounding ‘exhibiting’ atrocity.
Assessment: 4,000-word essay

MA students will also take two additional core modules:

Dissertation Preparation and Guided Reading (Holocaust and Genocide)

This module is designed to aid your planning and research for your dissertation. You will be supported to develop the relevant skills and produce a structured framework in the form of the preparation of a research proposal and literature review.
Assessment: 4,000-word dissertation portfolio

Dissertation or Placement-based Dissertation

If you choose to complete a written dissertation, this will be a substantial and sustained investigation of an aspect of the Holocaust and/or genocide in history and/or memory, culminating in a 15,000-word dissertation.

The placement-based dissertation is designed to appeal to: (a) students who have already begun their careers, and for whom this is a return to studying after considerable time in employment; and (b) students wishing to enhance their employability by making links within different professions.

The aim of this module is to provide an alternative to the more traditional dissertation route. The module focuses on practical rather than academic skills, which will complement the academic courses on offer across the rest of the MA programme The module is designed for students who have a clear idea of the areas in which they wish to work, and will therefore enable those students to develop and hone skills relevant to their career paths.

Placements are approved on a case by case basis and are subject to restrictions in terms of appropriateness within the subject area, the relevant professional and academic qualifications of the student, and the availability of academic staff.

Assessment: for the placement-based dissertation requires completion of 100 hours on Placement + either (a) a 10,000 word dissertation critically analysing and evaluating  reflecting on an aspect of the approach and/or work of the institution hosting the Placement. Or (b) write a report or conduct a piece of relevant research, or produce another form of media output for the Placement host.

Optional modules

Certificate students will take one optional module, while Diploma and MA students will take three optional modules. These can be chosen from the Department of Theology and Religion and the Department of Political Science and International Studies, or from the wider College of Arts and Law with the approval of the programme leader.

Options typically available within the Department of Theology and Religion include:

Options previously available within the Department of Political Science and International Studies have included:


Please note that the optional module information listed on the website for this programme is intended to be indicative, and the availability of optional modules may vary from year to year. Where a module is no longer available we will let you know as soon as we can and help you to make other choices.

Fees

We charge an annual tuition fee. Fees for 2019/20 are as follows:

MA

  • UK / EU: £9,250 full-time; £4,625 part-time
  • International: £18,450 full-time

Diploma

  • UK / EU: £6,167 full-time; £3,083 part-time
  • International: £12,300 full-time

Certificate

  • UK / EU: £3,083 full-time or part-time
  • International £6,150 full-time

For part-time students studying an MA or diploma, the above fee quoted is for year one only and tuition fees will also be payable in year two of your programme.

Fee status

Eligibility for UK/EU or international fees can be verified with Admissions. Learn more about fees for international students.

We can also confirm that EU students who are already studying at the University of Birmingham or who have an offer to start their studies in the 2019/20 academic year will continue to be charged the UK fee rate applicable at the time, provided this continues to be permitted by UK law. The UK Government has also confirmed that students from the EU applying to courses starting in the 2019/20 academic year will not see any changes to their loan eligibility or fee status. This guarantee will apply for the full duration of the course, even if the course finishes after the UK has left the EU.

Paying your fees

Tuition fees can either be paid in full or by instalments. Learn more about postgraduate tuition fees and funding.

Scholarships and studentships

Scholarships to cover fees and/or maintenance costs may be available. To discover whether you are eligible for any award across the University, and to start your funding application, please visit the University's Postgraduate Funding Database.

International students can often gain funding through overseas research scholarships, Commonwealth scholarships or their home government.

How To Apply

Application deadlines

The deadline for International students to apply is Wednesday 1 July 2020. The deadline for UK/EU students is Thursday 10 September 2020.

Before you make your application

You may wish to register your interest with us to receive regular news and updates on postgraduate life within this Department and the wider University.

Making your application

When clicking on the Apply Now button you will be directed to an application specifically designed for the programme you wish to apply for where you will create an account with the University application system and submit your application and supporting documents online. Further information regarding how to apply online can be found on the How to apply pages

Apply now

Our Standard Requirements

You will need a upper second-class Honours degree, or equivalent, in a relevant subject, e.g. humanities or social sciences. 

International/EU students

Academic requirements: We accept a range of qualifications from different countries - use our handy guide below to see what qualifications we accept from your country.

English language requirements: standard language requirements apply for this course - IELTS 6.5 with no less than 6.0 in any band.. If you are made an offer of a place to study and you do not meet the language requirement, you have the option to enrol on our English for Academic Purposes Presessional Course - if you successfully complete the course, you will be able to fulfil the language requirement without retaking a language qualification.

IELTS 6.5 with no less than 6.0 in any band is equivalent to:

  • TOEFL: 88 overall with no less than 21 in Reading, 21 Listening, 22 Speaking and 21 in Writing
  • Pearson Test of English (PTE): Academic 59 in all four skills
  • Cambridge English (exams taken from 2015): Advanced - minimum overall score of 176, with no less than 169 in any component

International Requirements


You will be given opportunities to come into contact with experts working in their subject areas, and begin networking with such experts and your postgraduate peers, through activities such as our annual colloquium on Holocaust and genocide.

Course delivery

We have two teaching terms per year, the autumn term and spring term. Term dates can be found on our website. 

The Research Skills module is primarily taught in an intensive two-day block in the autumn term, to be supported by self-directed e-learning. The dissertation preparation module is taught via a combination of seminars and individual supervision sessions; supervision meetings can take place in person or via Skype, subject to the agreement of your supervisor. Other modules are generally taught via weekly seminars over ten weeks. 

Full-time MA and Diploma students will typically take three modules in each term, while part-time students will typically take three modules across each year. For MA students, the taught modules will be followed by a 15,000-word dissertation.

Certificate students will take the first core module, Research Skills, in the autumn term; as above, this is delivered in a two-day block. The second core module, Holocaust and Genocide: Comparative and Interdisciplinary Perspectives, takes place in the spring term. We also recommend taking the optional module in the spring term. 

Each module typically represents a total of 200 hours of study time, including preparatory reading, homework and assignment preparation.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

 

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for your future career, but this can also be enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University and the College of Arts and Law.

The University's Careers Network provides expert guidance and activities especially for postgraduates, which will help you achieve your career goals. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated  careers and employability team who offer tailored advice and a programme of College-specific careers events.

You will be encouraged to make the most of your postgraduate experience and will have the opportunity to:

  • Receive one-to-one careers advice, including guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique, whether you are looking for a career inside or outside of academia
  • Meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs and employer presentations
  • Attend an annual programme of careers fairs, skills workshops and conferences, including bespoke events for postgraduates in the College of Arts and Law
  • Take part in a range of activities to demonstrate your knowledge and skills to potential employers and enhance your CV

What’s more, you will be able to access our full range of careers support for up to 2 years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Theology and Religion

Birmingham's Theology graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills including familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on statistical research.

Over the past 5 years, 94% of our postgraduates were in work and/or further study 6 months after graduation (DLHE 2012 - 2017). Many of our graduates go into careers in churches of various denominations. Other students use their transferable skills in a range of employment sectors, including publishing, education and social work. Employers that our graduates have gone on to work for include Church of England, Methodist Church, NHS and University of Birmingham.