Researching disability within an emancipatory paradigm

Location
Room 524, Room 524 in the School of Education
Category
Research, Social Sciences, Students
Dates
Thursday 4th December 2014 (16:00-17:00)
Download the date to your calendar (.ics file)
Contact

To reserve a place, please contact Önder İşlek
Email: OXI299@bham.ac.uk

You are warmly invited to the second seminar of Researching and Publishing regarding Disability Seminar Series(IES).

Professor Nick Hodge from Sheffield Hallam University will be discussing 'Researching disability within an emancipatory paradigm'. The talk will last about 40-45 minutes and it will be followed by a Q&A session.

Biography

Nick Hodge is a Professor of Inclusive Practice at Sheffield Hallam University. He is also Research Lead for the Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion and leader of the Equality, Diversity and Social Justice Research Group. His research projects include:

  • Towards a Research Engaged (Schools) Network . Sponsor, SHU HEIF, 2012–13.
  • 'The impact of high-tech AAC on the language and communication of students with autism'. Sponsor, NoRSACA, Nottingham 2008-10
  • 'Disabled people's experiences of anti-social behaviour and harassment in social housing: a critical review' Sponsor, Disability Rights Commission, 2006–7. 

Selected publications

  • Hodge, N and Runswick-Cole, K (2013) "They never pass me the ball": exposing ableism through the leisure experiences of disabled children, young peopleand their families. Children's Geographies 11(3): 311–325.
  • Hodge, N (2012) Counselling, Autism and the Problem of Empathy. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 1–2, iFirst.
  • Checkley, R, Reidy, L, Chantler, S, Hodge, N, & Holmes, K (2012) "Black white zebra orange orange"; how children with autism make use of high tech VOCAs in their language and communication at school. Journal of Assistive Technologies 6(4) 245–258.
  • Hodge, N (2012) Review of Disability Studies: An Interdisciplinary Introduction by Dan Goodley (Sage, 2011) for Educational Review 1–2 iFirst.
  • Checkley, R., Hodge, N., Chantler, S., Holmes, K. and Reidy, L. (2010) What children on the autism spectrum have to 'say' about using high tech voice output communication aids (VOCAs) in an educational setting. Journal of Assistive Technologies 4(1) 25–37.
  • Hodge, N. and Chantler, S. (2010) It's not what you do, it's the way that you question: that's what gets results. Support for Learning, 25 (1) 11–15.
  • Runswick-Cole, K. and Hodge, N. (2010) Educational Rights: challenging the discourse of special education. British Journal of Special Education, 36 (4) 198–203.

The seminars are organised by Önder İşlek (Doctoral student), Hayrunisa Pelge (Doctoral student) and Dr. Lila Kossyvaki (Research Fellow) and the project is funded by the Centre for Learning and Academic Development (CLAD) with the support of DISN (Disability, Inclusion and Special Needs).