Dr Scott Hayward PhD FRES

Dr Scott Hayward

School of Biosciences
Senior Lecturer - Molecular Ecophysiology

Contact details

Address
School of Biosciences
The University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
United Kingdom

Dr Hayward’s research group seeks to understand how organisms cope with variable and stressful environments. Temperate, polar and tropical terrestrial invertebrates (insects, mites and nematodes) are the primary focus of this endeavour. His lab uses state-of-the-art tools, and a systems biology approach, to investigate how these organisms detect, repair and stabilize the cellular and molecular damage induced by environmental stress, as well as their broader physiology and ecology. This research has fundamental applications in controlling agricultural pests and vectors of disease, as well as optimising ecosystem services such as pollination. Terrestrial invertebrates are also excellent biological thermometers in modelling the potential impact of climate change.

Qualifications

  • BSc (Zoology) University of Edinburgh
  • PhD University of Birmingham

Biography

  • 2020 – present: Senior Lecturer, University of Birmingham (UK)
  • 2008 - 2020: Lecturer, University of Birmingham (UK)
  • 2004 - 2008: Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Liverpool (UK)
  • 2002 - 2004: Royal Society & Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow, Ohio State University (USA)

Teaching

Dr Hayward’s roles have included being Head of the Biology Degree Programme, First Year Teaching Lead and Senior Exams Officer.  He is a member of the School of Biosciences Teaching Quality Enhancement Committee and is passionate about research-led teaching using a student-centred enquiry-based learning approach. He teaches on a number of undergraduate modules including BIO145 “Introduction to Evolution and Animal biology”; BIO171 “Ecological Concepts and Plant Sciences” in first year. BIO259 “Alpine Ecology”, the 2nd year field trip to Norway, as well as BIO278 “Animal Biology” and BIO279 “21st Century Ecosystems”. He is module organiser for the final year module BIO389, “Adaptation to Changing Environments”.  He interacts closely with the Higher Education Futures Initiative (HEFI) and is involved in teaching doctoral researchers and staff different approaches to learning and enhancing their academic practise, including online learning provision.

Postgraduate supervision

For a list of possible PhD projects offered by Dr Hayward:

www.findaphd.com/search/customlink.asp?inst=birm-Biol&supersurname=Hayward

Research

Environmental Adaptation in Insects

Our lab seeks to characterise how organisms detect, repair and stabilize the cellular and molecular damage induced by environmental stress; the magnitude and limitations of these responses, and their impact upon fitness and species ecology.

Work in the group addresses rapid, seasonal and long term (evolutionary) adaptations to environmental change using temperate, polar and tropical terrestrial invertebrate species. The group currently has four areas of research.

1. Environmentally adaptive dormancies - insect diapause:

Insect diapause represents the main strategy evolved by temperate insects to: a) coordinate their growth, development and reproduction (phenology) with annual cycles of changing environmental conditions; and b) survive seasonally recurring chronic forms of environmental stress.

We seek to identify key mechanisms underpinning diapause and its enhanced stress tolerance phenotype, the potential impact of climate change on diapause, and how this might disrupt the synchrony between insect species and their environment.

This work has direct relevance to enhancing food security and we collaborate with industry partners involved in the commercial production of insects for both pollination and biocontrol.

2. Molecular mechanisms underpinning multi-stressor responses:

Using a range of insect model systems, we employ state-of-the-art post-genomic, reverse genetic, metabolomic and lipidomic approaches to identify the molecular mechanisms that underpin temperature stress adaptation and how this can be disrupted by other stressors.

 

3. Life in extreme environments

Through a long-standing collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), our group investigates ecophysiological strategies employed by polar terrestrial invertebrates to cope with extreme environmental conditions.  We also examine the threat of climate change and invasive species to polar ecosystems, as well as the biogeography and evolutionary biology of polar insects. 

4. Birmingham Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR) Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) Facility

BIFoR FACE is a 10 year experiment examining the effect of elevated CO2 on mature temperate woodland ecosystems. Our group is spearheading insect research at this facility, documenting changing patterns of biodiversity, abundance and phenology, as well as plant-insect interactions with select herbivore and pollinator species.

Other activities

Dr Hayward is keen on all kinds of outdoor pursuits including hiking and kayaking.

Publications

Bartlett, J., Convey P. and Hayward S. A. L. (2020) Surviving the Antarctic Winter—Life Stage Cold Tolerance and Ice Entrapment Survival in The Invasive Chironomid Midge Eretmoptera murphyi. Insects 11, 147; doi:10.3390/insects11030147

Pertierra L R, Bartlett J. C., Duffy G., Vega G. C., Hughes K. A., Hayward S. A. L., Convey P., Olalla-Tarraga M. A. and Aragón P. (2019) Integrating correlative and mechanistic niche models with human pressures to assess biological invasion risks in Antarctica: examining the case of an introduced midge. Journal of Biogeography47:658-673

Bartlett, J., Convey P., Pertierra L. R. and Hayward S. A. L. (2019) An insect invasion of Antarctica: the past, present and future distribution of Eretmoptera murphyi (Diptera, Chironomidae) on Signy Island. Insect Conservation and Diversity13:77-90

Bartlett, J., Convey P. and Hayward S. A. L. (2019) Not so free range? Oviposition microhabitat and egg clustering affects Eretmoptera murphyi (Diptera: Chironomidae) reproductive success Polar Biology 42: 271–284.

Bartlett, J., Convey P. and Hayward S. A. L. (2019) Life cycle and phenology of an Antarctic invader: the flightless chironomid midge, Eretmoptera murphyi. Polar Biology 42: 115-130.

White, N. Bale, J. S. and Hayward S. A. L. (2018) Life-history changes in the cold tolerance of the two-spot spider mite Tetranychus urticae: applications in pest control and establishment risk assessment. Physiological Entomology 43:334-345.

PatemanR. M, ThomasC. D., HaywardS. A. L., HillJ. K. (2016) Macro- and microclimate interactions drive variation in species’ habitat associations. Global Change Biology 22:556-566.

Owen, E. L., Bale, J. S. and Hayward, S. A. L. (2016) Establishment risk of the commercially-imported Bumblebee Bombus terrestris dalmatinus – can they survive UK winters? Apidologie 47:66-75.

Coleman, P. C., Bale, J. S. and Hayward S. A. L. (2015) Meat Feeding Restricts Rapid Cold Hardening Response and Increases Thermal Activity Thresholds of Adult Blow Flies, Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae). PLoS ONE 10: e0131301

Everatt M. J., Worland M. R., Bale J. S., Convey, P. and Hayward, S. A. L (2015) Responses of invertebrates to temperature and water stress: A polar perspective.  Journal of Thermal Biology 54: 118-132

Hayward S. A. L. (2014) Application of functional ‘Omics’ in environmental stress physiology: insights, limitations, and future challengesCurrent Opinion in Insect Science 4: 35-41.

Everatt M. J., Worland M. R., Bale J. S., Convey, P. and Hayward, S. A. L (2014) Can the Antarctic terrestrial midge, Eretmoptera murphyi, tolerate life in water? Ecological Entomology 39: 732-735.

Everatt M. J., Worland M. R., Bale J. S., Convey, P. and Hayward, S. A. L (2014) Are the Antarctic dipteran, Eretmoptera murphyi, and Arctic collembolan, Megaphorura arctica, vulnerable to rising temperatures? Bulletin of Entomological Research 104:494-503.

Coleman, P. C., Bale, J. S. and Hayward S. A. L. (2014) Cross generation plasticity in cold hardiness is associated with diapause, but not the non-diapause developmental pathway, in the blow fly, Calliphora vicina.  Journal of Experimental Biology 217:1454-1461

Everatt M. J., Worland M. R., Bale J. S., Convey, P. and Hayward, S. A. L (2014) Contrasting strategies of resistance vs. tolerance to desiccation in two polar dipterans.  Polar Research, 33:22963

Hayward, S. A. L., Bruno Manso, Cossins, A. R. (2014) Molecular basis of chill resistance adaptations in poikilothermic animals.  Journal of Experimental Biology 217: 6-15.

Owen, E. L., Bale, J. S. and Hayward, S. A. L. (2013) Can winter-active bumblebees survive the cold? Assessing the cold tolerance of Bombus terrestris audax and the effects of pollen feeding.  PLoS ONE 8:  e80061.

Everatt M. J., Worland M. R., Bale J. S., Convey, P. and Hayward, S. A. L (2013) The effect of acclimation temperature on thermal activity thresholds in polar terrestrial invertebrates.  Journal of Insect Physiology 59:1057-1064.

Everatt M. J., Worland M. R., Bale J. S., Convey, P. and Hayward, S. A. L (2013) Heat tolerance and physiological plasticity in the Antarctic collembolan, Cryptopygus antarcticus, and mite, Alaskozetes antarcticus. Journal of Thermal Biology 38: 264-271.

Everatt M. J., Worland M. R., Bale J. S., Convey, P. and Hayward, S. A. L (2013) The impact of salinity on survival and temperature tolerance of the Antarctic collembolan, Cryptopygus antarcticus. Physiological Entomology 38:202-210.

Everatt M. J., Worland M. R., Bale J. S., Convey, P. and Hayward, S. A. L (2012) Pre-adapted to the maritime Antarctic? - Rapid cold hardening of the midge, Eretmoptera murphyi, Journal of Insect Physiology 58:1104-1111.

Bale, J. S. and Hayward, S. A. L. (2010) Insect overwintering in a changing climate.  Journal of Experimental Biology 213: 980-994.

Elnitsky, M. A., Hayward, S. A. L., Rinehart, J. P., Denlinger, D. L. & Lee, R. E. Jr. (2008)  Cryoprotective dehydration and the resistance to inoculative freezing in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarcticaJournal of Experimental Biology 211: 524-530.

Rinehart, J. P., Li, A. Q., Yocum, G. D., Robich, R. M.  Hayward, S. A. L. & Denlinger, D. L. (2007) Upregulation of heat shock proteins is essential for cold survival during insect diapause.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA. 104: 11130–11137.

Murray, P. A.*, Hayward, S. A. L.*, Govan, G. G., Gracey, A. Y. & Cossins, A. R. (2007) Acquired cold tolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans: and explicit test of the phospholipid saturation hypothesis.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 104: 5489-5494 * Joint first author

Hayward, S. A. L., Rinehart, J. P., Sandro, L. H., Lee, R. E. Jr. & Denlinger, D. L. (2007) Slow dehydration promotes desiccation and freeze tolerance in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarcticaJournal of Experimental Biology 210: 836-844.

Hayward, S. A. L., Murray, P. A., Gracey, A. Y. & Cossins, A. R. (2007) Beyond the lipid hypothesis: mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity in inducible cold tolerance.  Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 594: 132-142.

Rinehart, J. P., Hayward, S. A. L., Elnitsky, M. A., Sandro, L. H., Lee, R. E. & Denlinger, D. L. (2006) Continuous Up-regulation of heat shock proteins in larvae, but not adults, of a polar insect. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 103: 14223-14227.

Lee, R. E., Elnitsky, M. A., Rinehart, J. P., Hayward, S. A. L., Sandro, L. H. & Denlinger, D. L. (2006) Rapid cold-hardening increases the freezing tolerance of the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica. Journal of Experimental Biology 209: 399-406.

Hayward S. A. L., Pavlides, S. C., Tammariello, S. P., Rinehart, J. P. & Denlinger, D. L. (2005) Temporal expression patterns of diapause-associated genes in flesh fly pupae from the onset of diapause through post-diapause quiescence.  Journal of Insect Physiology 51: 631-640.

Hayward, S. A. L., Worland, M.R., Convey, P. & Bale, J. S. (2004) Habitat moisture availability and the local distribution of the Antarctic Collembola Cryptopygus antarcticus and Friesia grisea.  Soil Biology and Biochemistry 36: 927-934.

Hayward, S. A. L., Rinehart, J. P. & Denlinger, D. L. (2004) Desiccation and rehydration elicit distinct heat shock protein transcript responses in flesh fly pupae. Journal of Experimental Biology 207: 963-971.

Hayward, S. A. L., Worland, M.R., Convey, P. & Bale, J. S. (2003) Temperature preferences of the mite Alaskozetes antarcticus, and the collembolan, Cryptopygus antarcticus from the maritime Antarctic.  Physiological Entomology 28: 114-121.

Hayward, S. A. L., Bale, J. S., Worland, M.R. & Convey, P. (2001) Influence of temperature on the hygropreference of the Collembolan, Cryptopygus antarcticus, and the mite, Alaskozetes antarcticus from the maritime Antarctic.  Journal of Insect Physiology 47: 11-18.

Hayward, S. A. L., Worland, M.R., Bale, J. S. & Convey, P. (2000) Temperature and the hygropreference of the Arctic Collembolan Onychiurus arcticus and mite Lauroppia translamellataPhysiological Entomology 25: 266-272.

Saunders D. S. & Hayward S. A. L. (1998). Geographical and diapause-related cold tolerance in the blowfly, Calliphora vicinaJournal of Insect Physiology 44: 541-551.

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