Dr Regina Seiwald

Dr Regina Seiwald

Department of Modern Languages: German Studies
Lecturer in German Studies

Contact details

I am a native speaker of German and come from a village just outside Innsbruck in Austria. I completed my Mag. phil. degrees in German Philology (2006-2011), English and American Studies (2006-2012), as well as General and Applied Linguistics (2008-2013) at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. I have then joined Birmingham City University as a PhD student in the context of a research project on a comparative study of narratology in September 2014. I am a lecturer at the University of Birmingham since September 2014 and I teach German across the full range of language levels, academic as well as Open Access and Free for All.

Qualifications

  • Mag. phil. in General and Applied Linguistics, University of Innsbruck (2013)
  • Mag. phil. in English and American Studies, University of Innsbruck (2012)
  • Mag. phil. in German Philology, University of Innsbruck (2011)

Biography

I completed my Mag. phil. degrees in German Philology (2006-2011), English and American Studies (2006-2012), as well as General and Applied Linguistics (2008-2013) at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. I have then joined Birmingham City University as a PhD student in the context of a research project of a comparative study of narratology in September 2014. I am a lecturer at the University of Birmingham since September 2014 and I teach German across the full range of language levels, academic as well as Open Access and Free for All.

As a researcher, I am highly interesting in the relationship between literary theory and narratology across the languages. My focus thereby lies with the Anglo-American and Germanic tradition. In my PhD thesis, which will be submitted in February 2018, I am researching metafiction in the postmodern British novel in order to determine how texts communicate the relationship between fiction and reality. The outcome of my research is an open system of classification that allows me to determine how and to what effect texts overtly or covertly engage with their own fictionality, artefactuality, and constructedness. After my PhD, I want to research how this mechanism is realised in other media, particularly video games, and other literary epochs, notably German Romanticism.

I greatly enjoy teaching languages because in my opinion they allow us to gain an insight into a culture’s sentiments and people’s unique characteristics. I believe that learning languages is more than learning grammar and vocabulary – it is about experiencing the other in all its facets. 

Teaching

I teach German across all levels, from beginners to proficient speakers. I am also the module leader for German Level 1. Although my central focus is on language learning, my students also gain an insight into German, Austrian, and Swiss culture, day-to-day life, history, politics, and literature.

I have also taught several modules on literary theory in the School of English at Birmingham City University.

Research

My research interest lies with literary theory and narratology in English and German literature. In my PhD thesis, I have researched metafiction in the postmodern British novel based on a comparative analysis of English-speaking and German-speaking theories of narratology. In addition, I am interested in the concept of fictionality in other media, most notably films and video games. 

Publications

Chapters in books

  • with Ilona Mader, “Im Spannungsfeld von Tradition und Erneuerung: Wie J.J. Abrams und Doug Dorsts S. den Leser auf Reisen schickt.” Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2018. (forthcoming)

Articles in refereed journals

  • “Between the Natural and the Artificial: The Sublime Sexual Sensation of Car Crashes in J.G. Ballard’s Crash.Green Letters 23.2 (2019). (forthcoming)