Dr Francis Githae Muriithi MBChB (Nairobi), MMed O&G (Aga Khan), MSc EBHC (Oxford), MRCOG (UK)

Dr Francis Githae Muriithi

Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research
Doctoral Research Training Fellow in Global Women’s Health

Contact details

Address
WHO Collaborating Centre for Global Women’s Health
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
UK

Dr Muriithi is an Obstetrician and Gynaecologist with rich experience in various practice settings across Africa and the United Kingdom.

He is passionate about translating evidence into practice: A passion he acquired while he was an Oxford Academic Health Science Fellow in Evidence-Based Health Care.

His current research interest is on reducing preventable causes of maternal deaths in Africa and South Asia.

Besides, Dr Muriithi supports the evidence synthesis work for the multicountry E-MOTIVE project on PPH and for the Where and Why Mothers die project within which his doctoral research is nested.

His research supervisors are Dr Ioannis D. Gallos and Professor Arri Coomarasamy, while Dr Justin Chu is his clinical mentor.

Qualifications

  • Professional Certificate in Supporting Learning, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, 2018
  • MSc. in Evidence-Based Health care, Kellogg College, University of Oxford, 2018
  • MRCOG,Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (UK), 2015
  • Specialist Certificate in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board, 2015
  • Certificate in Sexual and Reproductive Health Research, Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research (GFMER), 2014
  • Master of Medicine (MMed) in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aga Khan University, 2013
  • Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBChB), University of Nairobi, 2006

Biography

Dr Muriithi is an Obstetrician and Gynaecologist with training in Evidence-Based Health Care and a rich experience in a wide variety of practice settings across Africa and the United Kingdom.

His current research interest is on methodologies for reducing preventable causes of maternal deaths in Africa and South Asia