Dr Jack Rogers

Dr Jack Rogers

School of Psychology
Lecturer in Psychology and Youth Mental Health

Contact details

Address
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT

Dr Rogers is a Lecturer in Psychology and Youth Mental Health based within the Institute for Mental Health, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham. His work uses different scientific methods such as clinical assessment, neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging techniques to better understand how brain maturation promotes normal cognitive development, and what causes this development to be derailed in young people at-risk for psychiatric conditions

Qualifications

BSc, MSc, PhD

Biography

Dr Rogers completed his PhD at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit in Cambridge working on speech processing and comprehension in the human brain. Dr Rogers was a Wellcome Trust funded post-doctoral researcher at the University of Oxford using functional MRI, and combined functional MRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques to explore the functional and anatomical organization of the human brain. Prior to taking up his lectureship at the University of Birmingham, Dr Rogers worked as a Research Fellow investigating the neural substrates associated with the development and prognosis of antisocial behavior in children and adolescents as part of the FemNAT-CD European project (www.femnat-cd.eu).

Teaching

Dr Rogers is the Co-PGT lead for the MSc in Mental Health.

Dr Rogers has been the module lead for the ‘Adult Neuropsychological Syndromes’ 3rd year module.

Postgraduate supervision

Dr Rogers is interested in supervising MSc and PhD projects. Potential students can contact him at j.rogers@bham.ac.uk.

Research

Dr Rogers conducts research investigating the behavioral and neural substrates associated with the development and prognosis of antisocial, aggressive and impulsive behavior in children and adolescents. His work uses different scientific methods such as clinical assessment, neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging techniques to better understand how brain maturation promotes normal cognitive development, and what causes this development to be derailed in young people at-risk for psychiatric conditions. This work enhances our current knowledge of environmental and individual characteristics of youth mental health identifying mechanisms (e.g. cognitive, neurobiological) that underpin a broad array of diagnostic presentations.  This can help inform early detection, successful intervention strategies and better prognosis.

Publications

Rogers, J.C., & Broome, M. R (2020) Effectiveness of multisystemic therapy for adolescent antisocial behaviour: follow-up findings from the START trial, The Lancet Psychiatry, Volume 7, Issue 5, May 2020, Pages 375-376

Gao, Y*., Rogers, J*., Clanton, R., Baker, R., Birch, P., Ferreira, L., Brown, A., Freitag, C. M.,

Fairchild, G., Rotshtein, P. & De Brito, S. (2019) Neural correlates of theory of mind in youth: Influence of sex, age and callous-unemotional traits. Scientific Reports. 9, 16216.

*Equal contribution.

Rogers, J.C., Gonzalez, K., Birch, P., Baker, R., Clanton, R., Pauli, R., Smaragdi, A., Konrad, K., Kohls, G., Raschle, N[…]De Brito.,S. (2019). White Matter Diffusivity in Youths with Conduct Disorder: Effects of Sex and Variation in Callous Traits. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 58, (12), pp. 1184–1196.

Rogers, J.C & Davis, M.H. (2017). Inferior frontal contributions to the recognition of spoken words and their constituent speech sounds. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 29 (5), 919-936. 

Rogers, J. C. & De Brito, S. A. (2016). Cortical and subcortical grey matter volume in youths with conduct problems: A voxel-wise meta-analysis. JAMA Psychiatry.

Baker, R. H., Clanton, R. L., Rogers, J. C., & De Brito, S. A. (2015). Neuroimaging findings in disruptive behavior disorders. CNS Spectrums. doi: 10.1017/S1092852914000789

Rogers, J.C, Mottonen, R., Boyles, R & Watkins, K. E (2014) Discrimination of

speech and non-speech sounds following theta-burst stimulation of the human motor cortex. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 754.

Smalle EHM, Rogers J. C, Mottonen R. (2015). Dissociating contributions of the motor cortex to speech perception and response bias by using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Cereb Cortex. 25:3690–3698.

Mottonen, R, Rogers, J.C & Watkins, K. E. (2014) Stimulating the motor lip representation using transcranial magnetic stimulation, Journal of Visualised Experiments, (88), e51665, doi:10.3791/51665

View all publications in research portal