English and Film year 2 modules

Compulsory modules

Film Theory and Criticism

The key aim of the module will be to develop students’ understanding of the major theoretical and critical debates that underpin contemporary film studies. A wide variety of approaches will be covered in detail, encouraging close appreciation and understanding of the central theoretical and critical issues.

Aesthetics of Television

This module offers students the opportunity to engage critically and theoretically with a range of aesthetic styles in contemporary television. Working through examples from both US and UK programming, and across various genres, the module provides a detailed and comprehensive investigation of the methods and strategies employed by television practitioners as they seek to convey thematic and narrative content. As well as acquainting students with the critical appreciation of aesthetic elements such as lighting, costume, performance, camera technique and music, this module will address the fundamental issue of television’s status as an art form in contemporary culture, testing the claims made for creative ambition and achievement against broader contexts of value, judgement and taste.

American and World Cinema

The key aim of the module will be to develop students’ understanding of the styles, forms and attitudes of American Cinema in relation to examples of world cinemas. In particular, this module examines the discourse and dialogue between American and European cinema since 1990, focussing on key examples of independent American cinema and the European art house, as well as examples of films and filmmakers from mainstream American and European cinemas. Films will be approached as cultural, industrial and artistic products, with a secondary attention paid to the relationships between film and national identity. A wide variety of approaches will be covered in detail, encouraging close appreciation and awareness of genre as a means of interpreting and analysing film. In addition, a wide-ranging contextual analysis will situate the films and filmmakers in relation to prevailing philosophical and political ideologies and movements. 

Optional modules (may include) 

Students may also apply to be considered for a work experience placement which will be taken in place of one of their taught modules if their application is successful.

Histories of Literature (students choose 2)  

  • Songs and Sonnets: English Poetry from Wyatt to Donne

  • The Canterbury Tales 

  • Popular Fiction before the Novel

  • Epic Ambitions

  • Stories of the Novel

  • Writing the Restoration

  • Fin de Siecle

  • Romantics and Romanticisms

  • Victorian Literature

  • Aspects of Modernism 

  • New World Orders? Literature after 1945

  • Twenty-First-Century Literature

Themes in Literature (students choose 1)

  • Colonial/Postcolonial 

  • Digital Futures

  • Enterprising English 

  • Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies 

  • Rags and Riches: Wealth and Poverty in American Literature and Culture 

  • Shakespeare's Sisters

  • The Gothic

  • The Use of Genre: Nefarious Plots, Cheap Thrills and the Search for Meaning

  • Tragedy

  • Utopia/Dystopia

  • Rude Writing: Satire and its Targets

or 

Shakespeare: Elizabethan and Jacobean

Digital and Documentary Filmmaking

or

Film Genre