New Study Elaborates Relationship between Marketing Research and Technology

Posted on Monday 16th March 2009

As technological advances continue to have an impact on marketing research practices, an academic at the University of Birmingham has proposed ways that researchers can make appropriate choices at different stages of the research process.

Doctor Eric Shiu, in a new book - Marketing Research, analyses the use of technology-enabled market intelligence, geographic information system, Facebook, Second Life and a new electronic form of consumer data - consumer-generated media (CGM).

The book is also co-written by three academics – Joseph Hair, Robert Bush, and David Ortinau.

In the publication, cases from different European countries have been used to illustrate different marketing research concepts and practices.

Some of the companies that the authors studied include Guinness, Nokia, IKEA, and Red Bull. 

“We have used numerous European companies and real life events throughout the text in order to enable readers to better understand and stimulate their interest in marketing research, which is traditionally regarded as a relatively difficult and boring subject,” Dr. Eric Shiu revealed.

The book also looks at the importance of qualitative and quantitative research methods and the accuracy of data collection and analysis. 

Marketing Research is published in March 2009, by Mc-Graw Hill. 

Ends

Notes to Editor

  1. Eric Shiu currently teaches marketing research as well as product and innovation management for the MSc Marketing programmes at the University of Birmingham Business School.
  2. Eric has published widely in quality journals such as International Journal of Market Research, Service Industries Journal, Technovation, and Journal of Marketing Management. He also received a number of research awards and research grants, such as from European Science Foundation recently

For further information:

Anietie Isong – International Press Officer, University of Birmingham

Tel: 0121 414 47863 / email: a.isong@bham.ac.uk