Prospective students learn about Birmingham

Posted on Wednesday 9th September 2009

Thousands of prospective students will be exploring their higher education options when they attend the University of Birmingham Open Day on Saturday 12 September. 

The event, which is open to college and sixth-form students as well as parents, takes place from 10am to 3.30pm at the Edgbaston campus. It will feature displays and talks designed to help students make designed to help students with their future study and career choices.

Each year, the university attracts more than 30,000 visitors to its open days across the year. Visitors will learn more about the University and the courses on offer across the academic schools and departments. Tours of the Edgbaston campus and University accommodation will also be on offer.

Students who are visiting alone can also take advantage of the Open Day Buddy Scheme which encourages interaction between a current and a prospective student.

Liz Murphy, Director of Student Recruitment at the University of Birmingham, said: “It is important for students to choose the right course and the right place of study. Our open days provide a good opportunity for students, parents and teachers to find out what this vibrant university and city have to offer.

We also make sure staff and current students will be on hand to answer any questions about life and study and Birmingham that visitors may have."

Some of the topics that will be covered during the talks include: ‘Chemical Magic’, ‘Can Computers Think?’ and ‘Darwin and Evolution in Birmingham'.

For full details including the programme and directions, visit the open day website.  

ENDS


For further information contact: Ben Hill, Head of Communications, University of Birmingham, Tel 0121 4146681, Mob 07789 921163

Images of current student Niamh Quille and University researcher and Birmingham graduate Dr Chris Bunce are available on request.

Image: Dr Chris Bunce is a graduate of Birmingham and a researcher looking for ways to reduce the toxicity of traditional leukaemia drugs and finding new targets to assist the development of new drugs.

Niamh Quille is a second year student in Political Science student who is also one of the University’s student ambassadors.