MA Antiquity: Classics pathway

The Antiquity MA: Classics pathway is for students interested in advanced study of any aspect of Greco-Roman civilisation. Modules emphasise independent interpretation of primary evidence, and encourage you to draw connections across historical periods, between different types of evidence (textual, archaeological, iconographic), and between different cultures.

Most students take at least one Classical language, whether they are a beginner or more advanced. This programme offers an ideal opportunity to pursue your interests in greater depth and also provides an ideal foundation for further research at doctoral level. This is one of several pathways available on the Antiquity MA.

Course fact file

Type of Course: Taught

Study Options: Full time, part time

Duration: 1 year full-time, 2 years part-time

Start date: September 2013

Details

 

This is the degree for you if you enjoyed studying the ancient world as an undergraduate, and would now like to study Classics in greater depth and at a higher level; or if you want to explore this aspect of antiquity and it wasn’t included in your first degree. It allows you to specialise, but also encourages you to branch out into related disciplines and to consider interdisciplinary approaches.

If you are a beginner in Classical language, our specially-designed graduate linguistic skills modules provide you with a high level of competence in the course of one year. If you have studied the languages already, we will take you forward from whatever point you have reached.

You will study three core modules [full descriptions available below]:

  • Herodotus and Ancient Worlds
  • Approaches to Images, Material Culture and Texts
  • Research Skills

You will also choose three optional modules from across all of the programme’s pathways, offering the opportunity for interdisciplinary study. You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a subject of your choice, with one-to-one expert supervision.  

Why study this course

The University of Birmingham has a distinguished tradition of Classical scholarship going back more than a hundred years. Particular current research strengths include: Greek mythology and religion; Greek and Latin poetry and its reception, both in European literature and film and in modern popular culture; drama, democracy, and citizenship in Ancient Greece; and the social history, and modern reception, of Roman cities and of the City of Rome in particular.

With such a range of expertise available, you will be supported to explore your specific interests, particularly through the dissertation.

Modules

You will study three core modules:

Herodotus and Ancient Worlds

Herodotus’ text is the perfect example of the curiosity, openness to new ideas and interdisciplinary ethos which characterise Classics as a discipline. You work with a unique team including not only classicists and ancient historians but also specialists in Egyptology and Near Eastern Studies to investigate this ground-breaking text, which is both quintessentially Greek and richly intertwined with other cultures of the ancient Mediterranean. Inquirer, historian, ethnographer, and story-teller, Herodotus constantly challenges us to reflect on just what is involved in making sense of other cultures.

Approaches to Images, Material Culture and Texts

This module invites you to experiment with interdisciplinary approaches. Linked to a series of research seminars by academic staff, the module is a forum in which staff and students work together to identify significant current directions in research, and to explore links, and differences, between academic disciplines.

Research Skills

This module will help you to develop the skills necessary for graduate level research, introduce you to the latest methods and techniques for interpreting primary sources, and demonstrate how to make critical use of scholarly works. You will learn how to define and approach interesting research questions, and develop an overview of the fields of scholarship most relevant to your pathway

You will also choose three optional modules, from a range which typically includes:

  • Ancient Greek or Latin Language (beginners, intermediate or advanced)
  • Archaeology of Greece
  • Empire and Identity: The City in the Roman West
  • Individuals in History
  • Myth and Text in Antiquity
  • Research Project Development

Some of these optional modules will form the core of other pathways.

Fees and funding

We charge an annual tuition fee. Fees for 2014/15 are as follows:

  • Home / EU: £5,940 full-time; £2,970 part-time
  • Overseas: £13,665 full-time

Learn more about fees and funding 

Scholarships and studentships

Scholarships to cover fees and/or maintenance costs may be available. To discover whether you are eligible for any award across the University, and to start your funding application, please visit the University's Postgraduate Funding Database.

International students can often gain funding through overseas research scholarships, Commonwealth scholarships or their home government.

University of Birmingham graduates - including those due to graduate in summer 2014 - may be entitled to a fee reduction through the College of Arts and Law Alumni Bursary scheme.

Entry requirements


Learn more about entry requirements

International students

Academic requirements

We accept a range of qualifications; our country pages show you what qualifications we accept from your country.

English language requirements

You can satisfy our English language requirements in two ways:

How to apply

When clicking on the Apply Now button you will be directed to an application specifically designed for the programme you wish to apply for where you will create an account with the University application system and submit your application and supporting documents online. Further information regarding how to apply online can be found on the How to apply pages

Apply now

Learning and teaching

The research modules will train you to a professional level in bibliographic research, project development, information management and retrieval, oral presentation, active listening, and a range of subject-specific skills tailored to this pathway.

You will also become part of, and contribute to, the vibrant international community of the College of Arts and Law Graduate School, which offers dedicated research resources and a supportive working environment. Our team of academic and operational staff are on hand to offer support and advice to all postgraduate students within the College.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support through the English for International Students Unit (EISU).

Employability

The University of Birmingham has been ranked 8th in the UK and 60th in the world for post-qualification employability in the latest global survey of universities commissioned by the International Herald Tribune.

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by the employability skills training offered through the College of Arts and Law Graduate School.

Graduates with a postgraduate degree in Antiquity can boast a wide combination of skills that can be applied in many types of work and which employers regard very positively. That’s why historically, over 91% of Classics, Ancient History and Archaeology postgraduates have been in employment or further study within six months of graduating.