Research in Music

Birmingham's Music Department was ranked joint second out of all the country's 53 Music departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The work of all staff was returned for the RAE and a full 50% of our work was judged 'world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour'; a further 35% was judged 'internationally excellent'. This follows our top ranking of 5* in the 2001 RAE.

Our research community includes approximately ten staff and 45 research students, and we particularly welcome students from the EU and overseas.

Two important areas of our research are given additional focus by the activities of the Centre for Early Music Performance and Research (CEMPR) and the Centre for Composition and Associated Studies (COMPASS).

The Department’s research corresponds to the University’s major research theme ‘Heritage, Cultural Production and Interpretation’. Key themes within our research areas are:

Musical Composition 

Photograph of two students working with music software on computersElectroacoustic, conventional and mixed media

See MiniBEAST Listening Sessions

See COMPASS Forum seminars

Electroacoustics - Jonty Harrison

Instrumental / Vocal - Michael Zev Gordon

Mixed Instrumental and Electroacoustic / Live and Interactive Electroacoustics, Laptop Performance, Multichannel Spatialisation - Scott Wilson

Musicology

music-postgraduateRanging from the medieval to the contemporary and across a number of European musical cultures.

See Seminars

Music in its Historical, Social and Cultural Contexts

British Music StudiesMedieval to Eighteenth Century - Mary O’Neill

Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries - Andrew Kirkman

Seventeenth Century, Early Modern Gender Studies - Amy Brosius

Early Modern - John Whenham and Colin Timms

Classical Period - Matthew Riley

Nineteenth Century - Paul Rodmell

Twentieth Century - Ben Earle and Paul Rodmell

Ethnomusicology, Sound Studies, Popular Music - Eliot Bates

Text and Interpretation

Detail from an old manuscriptMedieval to Eighteenth Century - Mary O’Neill

Renaissance - Andrew Kirkman

Seventeenth Century - Amy Brosius

Late Renaissance to Late Baroque - John Whenham and Colin Timms

Classical Period - Matthew Riley

Nineteenth Century - Paul Rodmell

Twentieth Century - Ben Earle and Paul Rodmell

Performance Practice 

Photograph of the keys in a keyboard instrumentMedieval to Eighteenth Century - Mary O’Neill

Renaissance - Andrew Kirkman

Late Renaissance to Late Baroque - John Whenham and Colin Timms

Aesthetics and Music Theory

Ben Earle and Matthew Riley