Collaboration with China in energy storage technologies – broader and more strengthened

Experts from the University of Birmingham visited a leading Chinese company to discuss working together to tackle global power problems.

They travelled to Beijing and met with Sinochem Group in the latest stage of discussions to develop a partnership in energy storage technologies. 

Sinochem is a leading Chinese company in energy, agriculture and chemicals, with a history as long as the People’s Republic of China. It has over 300 subsidiaries around the world, including several listed companies. 

Sinochem22

Pro-Vice-Chancellor Professor Andy Schofield, who led the University of Birmingham delegation and is pictured above, centre-left, said: “Both the UK and China share a same strategic vision in developing more efficient, clean and low carbon energy systems. 

"The University of Birmingham possesses world-leading expertise in energy storage – a field which has been recognised as a key part of this important development. We are always looking to forge new and mutually beneficial long-term partnerships with China around energy storage technologies. I sincerely hope we can form such a partnership with Sinochem.” 

Vice President of Sinochem Professor Bin Li said: “Energy is a core part of Sinochem’s business. I am delighted that based on our good relationships cultivated over the years, Sinochem and University of Birmingham are now working closely in developing mutually beneficial collaborations. 

“These partnerships  will further enhance our R&D and innovation capabilities, which will help us make greater contributions to the clean and low carbon energy system development of our respective countries.” 

ENDS

For more information, please contact Tony Moran, International Communications Manager, University of Birmingham on +44 (0) 121 414 8254 or  +44 (0)782 783 2312. For out-of-hours enquiries, please call +44 (0) 7789 921 165.

Notes to Editors

  • The University of Birmingham is ranked amongst the world’s top 100 institutions, its work brings people from across the world to Birmingham, including researchers and teachers and more than 5,000 international students from over 150 countries.