Future engineers get second bite at Birmingham language course

Engineering students around the globe have a second chance to sign up for the University of Birmingham’s online training that will help them improve their technical English language skills – free-of-charge.

Following the success of ‘Electrical Engineering: Sensing, Powering and Controlling’, the University is repeating the course, which aims to support students for whom English is a second language in mastering many of the key terms and concepts in Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering.

Birmingham’s MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) is based on real first-year modules at the University. Students can sign up for the free course online.

The MOOC is aimed at direct entry students planning to attend Birmingham to study in the discipline of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, but the content is helpful to any student planning to start in the first year of any engineering discipline.

The three-week course runs from 22 January 2018 and has been developed by the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences. It is led by Dr Tim Jackson, Senior Lecturer in the School of Engineering.

Dr Jackson said: “Following the huge demand for the original course, we are running it again as it offers such a great opportunity for students whose first language is not English to get to grips with the key terms and concepts associated with engineering.

“The course is delivered in English to help students to gradually develop their language skills. Students can learn online at their own pace, and there are opportunities to discuss their work online with fellow students and lecturers.”

Topics covered include:

  • Overview of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering
  • Transducers and their purpose
  • Electronic systems in context
  • Solar power / batteries in space
  • The Space Weather research group
  • Electrical circuits
  • Analogue and digital electrical engineering

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Investigate what is meant by electronic, electrical and systems engineering.
  • Develop their skills in analysing and designing circuits and systems.
  • Improve their confidence in communicating engineering ideas using English technical vocabulary.
  • Assess how different electronic and electrical engineering systems are used in specific contexts.

ENDS

For further information or to arrange an interview, please contact Tony Moran in the University of Birmingham press office on +44 (0)121 414 8254 / +44 (0)782 783 2312.

Notes to editors

The University of Birmingham is ranked amongst the world’s top 100 institutions, its work brings people from across the world to Birmingham, including researchers and teachers and more than 5,000 international students from over 150 countries.