Your Home, Your Wellbeing – An insight into experiences of social housing tenants, shared owners and those on the social housing waiting list

CHASM have developed a fascinating infographic in partnership with East Devon District Council and LiveWest Homes to summarise the first year results of their three year project examining the links between social tenancies and personal wellbeing. 

The Your Home, Your Wellbeing infographic demonstrates that social housing plays an important and positive role in the overall wellbeing of those that live in this form of housing.  Compared to those who are currently on the waiting list for a social home, many of whom are living in the private rental sector, social renters report significantly greater life-satisfaction (with 72% of all social renters being satisfied, compared to 54% of those on the waiting list) and are much less likely to be anxious. Whereas 42% of those on the waiting list report being anxious, only 26% of those in social housing do so – and those on the waiting list  are nearly twice as likely to be unhappy with their lives than EDDC and LiveWest respondents.

There are some clear clues that are emerging from our research to help explain this. The infographic also shows that far fewer – though still far too many - social renters are struggling to make ends meet. Just over two thirds of those on the waiting list say they are struggling, compared to half of LiveWest tenants and a third of those with East Devon District Council.  However, these infographic figures do not tell us that those living in social housing live trouble-free lives. There is still a high level of disadvantage faced by some groups. But what the infographic does show is that social housing can make a big difference to quality of life and well-being for those living in this form of housing.  For many who may not be able to afford to own the home they live in, for whatever reason, social housing provides a key foundation for their personal wellbeing.

Dr James Gregory, who leads on this project for CHASM, and CHASM Director Professor Andy Lymer, are now collecting a second year of data for this longitudinal project