How a University of Birmingham Physics and Astronomy student contributed to solving the global energy crisis

Libby Energy

University of Birmingham Physics and Astronomy undergraduate student, Libby Moxon, spent her summer working on the development of fusion energy technology at Tokamak Energy.

Libby explains: "Fusion energy is something that could bring limitless clean energy and go some way to eradicate the global energy crisis if achieved."

Speaking of Libby’s contributions at Tokamak, her line manager advised: "Libby's work involved adding new physics to a code used in the design of future Tokamak fusion reactors. Using this improved code, we then explored how key parameters affected different aspects of Tokamak performance. This work helped Tokamak Energy better understand how to optimise future reactors and accelerate the development of fusion power."

In an article published by Times Higher Education, Libby details how her course at the University of Birmingham prepared her for ground-breaking work undertaken at Tokamak Energy. As a part of this article entitled Women in STEM: how studying physics can help solve real world problems, Libby also shares details of her experiences, such as calibrating the UK’s newest reactor. Libby’s work has also been referenced in Renewable energy: the growth industry on the hunt for graduates, an article published by The Guardian.

Since completing her summer placement, Libby has since returned to the University of Birmingham to complete the final year of her MSci Physics course.