'Outstanding' paper award for former PhD student

Former Centre for Applied Psychology PhD student, Kuljit Heer, is celebrating after her paper ‘The experiences of British South Asian carers caring for a child with developmental disabilities in the UK’, was awarded the mark of ‘Outstanding’ from the Tizard Learning Disability Review.

Kuljit’s PhD focus was on parents from a range of South Asian cultural groups and their views on the impact of having a child with intellectual disabilities. Her other papers also included a description of the views of parents who lived in India as well as the UK which meant she was able to access a real cross cultural comparison. Her papers contribute to a growing literature on the experience of South Asian parents who care for children with intellectual disabilities. It has important messages for workers about how to support these individuals most effectively.

Other papers from her PhD included:

Heer, K., Rose, J., & Larkin, M. (2016). The Challenges of Providing Culturally Competent Care Within a Disability Focused Team A Phenomenological Exploration of Staff Experiences. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 27, 2, 109 – 116.

Heer, K., Larkin, M. and Rose, J. (2015) The experiences of British South Asian carers caring for a child with developmental disabilities in the UK. Tizard Learning Disability Review, 20, 4,228 -238.

Heer, K., Rose, J. Larkin, M. and Singhal, N. (2015) The experiences of mothers caring for a child with developmental disabilities: A cross cultural perspective. International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, 8, (4), 218-233.

Heer, K., Larkin, M. And Rose, J. (2012) Understanding the experiences and needs of South Asian families caring for a child with learning disabilities in the UK:  an experiential-contextual framework.  Disability and Society. 27, 7, 949 – 963. 

Heer, K., Larkin, M., Rose, J. And Burchess, I. (2012) The cultural context of care-giving: qualitative accounts from South Asian parents who care for a child with intellectual disabilities in the UK, Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities 6:4, 179 – 191.