The Edward Cadbury Centre for the Public Understanding of Religion

The Edward Cadbury Centre for the Public Understanding of Religion was established in 2014 to enhance the public understanding of religion regionally, nationally and internationally through a series of distinctive, strategic and engaged interdisciplinary programmes. We deliver innovative, interdisciplinary, impact-driven and internationally-excellent research exploring the significance of religious belief and practice for public and professional life, working with faith communities and policy makers to develop informed agendas for social transformation.

 

News

25 January 2019

The most scandalous myths about the virgin Mary

Mary has been subject to more rumors than almost any biblical figure - Professor Candida Moss (Department of Theology & Religion) explores some of these myths for the Daily Beast.

14 December 2018

Are the Gospels finished works?

Some modern Christians believe the Bible contains no mistakes, inconsistencies or inaccuracies. Professor Candida Moss reports for the Daily Beast about a new book from a Princeton scholar arguing that the Gospel of Mark was more like a rough draft or collection of notes than a fully polished book.

12 December 2018

What is the role of women in terror?

Last month, Dr Katherine Brown (Department of Theology & Religion) was a panellist at a Cambridge Union discussion on the role of women in terror.

05 December 2018

Did this ring belong to Pontius Pilate?

Professor Candida Moss reports for The Daily Beast on recent claims that a ring discovered in the late 1960s may have belonged to Pontius Pilate, the fifth prefect of the Roman province of Judea from roughly 26-36 A.D and the man responsible for passing final judgment on Jesus.

21 November 2018

One of Jesus' most famous lines wasn't in original Gospels

Professor Candida Moss reports for The Daily Beast about new research arguing that one of the most famous moral teachings involving Jesus and an adulterous woman didn't become part of the Bible until at least a hundred years after the Gospel of John was written.

09 November 2018

Three faiths, one question: why do good people do bad things?

Join Dr Jeremy Kidwell (Department of Theology & Religion) as speakers from three religions (Christianity, Islam, Sikhism) explore concepts and assumptions that underlie each and how these lead to differing worldviews. The starting point will be the question, 'Why good people do bad things?'

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