Engineering and Physical Sciences in the media - March 2016

Birmingham’s contribution to the detection of gravitational waves continued to reverberate around the globe with Dr Haixing Miao (School of Physics and Astronomy) interviewed by the Chinese state broadcaster for CCTV America, broadcasting to some 75 million viewers across the USA. Professor Alberto Vecchio (School of Physics and Astronomy) was quoted in The Sunday Times discussing the Gravitational Waves discovery and how LIGO scientists have detected other cosmic echoes, like colliding neutron stars and black holes consuming dead stars. 

Academics from the School of Physics and Astronomy also contributed to the March 2016 edition of Ligo Magazine including an introduction by Professor Andreas Freise, Editor in Chief. 

Professor Yulong Ding (School of Chemical Engineering) was interviewed by Chinese publication China Energy News on the subject of energy storage.

The partnership between University of Birmingham and University of Melbourne was covered by Times Higher Education and The Birmingham Post.  The agreement includes a joint PhD programme co-funded by both institutions giving up to 20 ‘Priestley Scholars’ in engineering the opportunity to study alongside world-leading academics in Birmingham and Melbourne.

Dr Nick Hawes (School of Computer Science) featured on BBC Radio 4 – The Now Show discussing Artificial Intelligence and the first victory of a computer over a top ranked human in the ancient board game of Go.  

Professor Duc Pham (School of Engineering) provided comment to the Centre for Remanufacturing and Reuseon a new £1.94m five year collaborative project researching how robots can help the manufacturing industry use natural resources more efficiently.

Professor Paula Mendes (School of Chemical Engineering) has been featured in The Times discussing a new blood analysis for prostate cancer which could save lives and prevent thousands of unnecessary operations.

An article by Dr Nicole Metje (Department of Civil Engineering) on ways to identify more accurately what is below ground, titled ‘Making the underworld visible’, has been featured by EPSRC