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Two older women on the beach looking at the sea. One sat on a chair and one standing.

Researchers at the University of Birmingham are calling on older LGBTQ+ people in social care to take part in a new research project.

The LGBTQ+ Older Adult Social Care Assessment Study (LOASCA) will seek to understand how social care providers take into account sexuality and gender identity when assessing support needs for older LGBTQ+ people.

The study is being conducted by the University of Birmingham, along with researchers at the University of Manchester, University of Bristol, and Opening Doors.

Dr Jason Schaub, Associate Professor in Social Work, who is leading the study said: “Little research exists when it comes to the experiences of older LGBTQ+ people in adult social care, and this study presents an exciting opportunity to change that. We want to understand how social care is, or is not, informed by an older person’s gender identity or sexual orientation.”

Based on available research, the needs, visibility and awareness of the older LGBTQ+ population remain low in care contexts because of different factors impacting both service users and service providers.

As part of the LOASCA project, the research team is conducting interviews with LGBTQ+ people over 60, who have experience of social care.

We are actively recruiting participants at the moment and would love to hear from anyone over 60 in the LGBTQ+ community, who has had experience of adult social care in England. This is an opportunity to have an often-overlooked group of people express their voices and share their stories in a safe way, which we can use to improve social care services.

Dr Jason Schaub, University of Birmingham

Dr Schaub continued: “A vital part of our research is to hear from LGBTQ+ people that are over 60. We want to hear from people who have experience of the adult social care system first-hand, so that we can get the full picture of how the system treats and supports older LGBTQ+ people.

“We are actively recruiting participants at the moment and would love to hear from anyone over 60 in the LGBTQ+ community, who has had experience of adult social care in England. This is an opportunity to have an often-overlooked group of people express their voices and share their stories in a safe way, which we can use to improve social care services.”

If you would like to get involved in the project, or learn more, you can get in touch with Dr Dora Jandric, the research fellow on the project, by emailing her on d.jandric@bham.ac.uk, or by visiting this link for more information on the study.