Case studies on activities IPHE contributors have been involved in

Working with other IPHE contributors to produce case based scenarios for use in Interprofessional Learning

Interprofessional Learning in the College of Medical and Dental Sciences

Interprofessional Education (IPE) is based on the premise that students who learn about, from and with each other during their training will be able to work together more effectively once they qualify. The World Health organisation have defined IPE as occurring when: ‘two or more professions learn about, from and with each other in order to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes’ WHO 2010.

Governing bodies of professional healthcare programmes, in recognition, now include requirements to involve patients, carers and their families in different ways in the educational processes and in developing curricula.

The College of Medical and Dental Sciences hosts a number of healthcare programmes (nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physician associates, dentistry and dental and hygiene therapy). The College IPE Steering Group includes faculty representatives from each programme, together with colleagues representing physiotherapy, social work and clinical psychology from other Colleges. Together with student representatives from the IPE student society and IPHE representatives, the Steering Group are developing IPE learning experiences, which provide students with opportunities to work together throughout their programmes. The IPE Educational Framework and Outcomes (2020) moves students from an awareness of the importance of interprofessional working when they enter their healthcare programme through a stage of knowledge and skills building, to the application of knowledge in a teamwork situation in their final years.

References

Birmingham Interprofessional Education Steering Group. Interprofessional Education (IPE) at the University of Birmingham. Educational framework and outcomes
February 2020

World Health Organization 2010 Framework for action on interprofessional education and collaborative practice. Available here. [Accessed 17 02 20]

A summary from Carol Miller, IPHE

Carol volunteered to be a member of the College of Medical and Dental Sciences Interprofessonial Steering Group. She has also been involved with a group of other IPHE contributors in the development of case study scenarios and here is a summary from her on her involvement:

Carol MillerQuestions and responses

Q: Tell me about your personal motivation for becoming involved with our College network?

A: Since my retirement, I have continued to have an interest in Education.

I previously worked as a speech and language therapist in the NHS and was a Senior Lecturer in Special Education at the University of Birmingham. I wanted to join the College Network in order to utilise the experience I have gained in education and training.

Q: Can you tell me about the specific IPHE activity that you have been involved in?

A: I have been involved in producing case based scenarios with other IPHE contributors for use in interprofessional learning with students across all healthcare programmes. One of the scenarios we produced was based on a contributor’s own healthcare experience with a son who has a rare genetic condition and learning disabilities.

I also sit on the IPE Steering Group in the College. It has been great to see the excellent work been done with programmes from different professions and how they are working together to promote interprofessional learning amongst student groups.

Q: What was it that appealed to you about being involved in the activity?

A: Having been involved in professional education I wanted to continue to contribute and help in the development of interprofessional learning.

Q: Who were the key stakeholders you worked with and what training or briefing did you have prior to starting the activity?

A: I met with a small group of contributors along with academic leads for a number of healthcare programmes to produce scenarios. I felt my contribution was greatly valued along with other contributors to produce the scenarios for interprofessional learning. We were all learning from each other and it is important that students are able to integrate and collaborate with other students across other programmes.

I am also a member on the IPE Steering Group working alongside academic staff and students across healthcare programmes including nursing, pharmacy, and medicine.

Q: What did you feel your main contribution was to the activity? What specific skills or insight did you bring?

A: Having an understanding and insight in education and a health care profession, I have enjoyed putting my skills and experience to good use.

Q: If you could give one piece of advice to a contributor who was interested in being involved in this activity, what would it be?

A: Our personal and professional experience can make a valuable contribution to the IPE Steering Group.

Q: Are there any other thoughts or reflections on this activity that you would like to share with us?

A: I have found it very rewarding to be involved. I get so much enjoyment from the work I have been involved in and seeing the excellent work that is been done. 

Here is some feedback for Dr Christine Hirsch, Senior Lecturer in Clinical Pharmacy. Christine is a member of the IPE Steering Group and worked with the group of contributors in the development of the case study scenarios:

We worked closely with Carol along with a small number of other group members to develop a series of patient case scenarios based on the experience of the group. Three of these case studies were used during an inter-professional learning session during the COVID 19 lockdown in June 2020.

Using a web conferencing system we conducted a learning session online with around 50 students from our different healthcare programmes. The students discussed the cases in small interprofessional groups to make recommendations for care whilst gaining an appreciation of the role that each profession could bring to the care of the patient and their families. Students were extremely positive about this opportunity and we will be rolling out another online session this academic year. 

Involvement in the student selection process for medical students

Governing bodies of professional healthcare programmes now include requirements to involve patients, carers and their families in different ways to be involved in the educational processes and in developing curricula.

Guidance from the General Medical Council (GMC) on patient and public involvement for undergraduate medical education, suggests that medical schools consider involving patients and the public in the selection of medical students on their programmes. The GMC, suggest that Medical Schools also consider the value of a patient or public perspective in their selection processes.

The College of Medical of Dental Science have over the last few years involved patient and public involvement in the selection process of medical students on the MBChB Programme (Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery). The interview process consists of a number of mini interviews known, as MMI’s (multiple mini interviews). Candidates have a number of interview stations where they will be asked a number of questions on various topics including a role-play scenario and mathematical calculations involving data that has clinical relevance. Each station will last about 10 minutes where candidates will interact with two interviewers and will be scored by each. A minimum performance standard is set for each station and the interview performance data is used in the decisions on whether an offer is made to a candidate.

A summary with Deb Smith, IPHE contributor

Deb SmithDeb has been involved in the selection of medical students attending some MMI’s and here is a summary of her involvement bases on a series of questions that were asked.

Questions and responses

Q: Tell me about your personal motivation for becoming involved with our College network?

A: I have previously been involved at Coventry University for a number of years as a patient contributor and a lay member on the CLAHRC (Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research) West Midlands since 2014.

When the College of Medical and Dental Sciences were looking for contributors for the IPHE Group, I was keen to be involved in Education to use my skills and knowledge and share my experience as a patient.

Q: Can you tell me about the specific IPHE activity that you have been involved in?

A: I have attended a number of Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs) for the selection process of medical students on the MBChB Programme. I was fully prepared for what to expect, as I had previously been involved in this activity at another local education provider.

Q: What was it that appealed to you about being involved in the activity?

A: I enjoyed contributing to the process of appointing prospective students onto the programme.

Q: Who were the key stakeholders you worked with and what training or briefing did you have prior to starting the activity?

A: I was provided with comprehensive information packs and the whole process was fully explained, including the scoring system by the Admissions Tutor and Team. I was also invited to observe sessions before interviewing on my own, which was helpful. I was given examples of the ideal answers I should expect.

Q: What did you feel your main contribution was to the activity? What specific skills or insight did you bring?

A: It is important to have good listening and observation skills. Having these skills, helps in the assessment process to ensure questions were answered correctly and fully to the required criteria.

Q: If you could give one piece of advice to a contributor who was interested in being involved in this activity, what would it be?

A: I thoroughly enjoyed the experience, despite being challenging and at a quick pace! It is important to prepare and be on time!

Q: Are there any other thoughts or reflections on this activity that you would like to share with us?

A: I was impressed on how the whole process ran so smoothly.

Involvement of IPHE contributor in the delivery of teaching sessions to students on the MPharm and MSc Genomic Medicine programmes

The importance of the patient as a teacher of healthcare professionals in training has been recognised for many years.1 in terms of motivating students, bringing context to the learning experience and developing empathy and communication skills.2

Governing bodies of professional healthcare programmes now include requirements to involve patients, carers and their families in different ways to be involved in the educational processes and in developing curricula.

References

  1. Osler W. The hospital as college. In: Lewis HK, ed. Aequanimatus, and Other Addresses. London: British Medical Association 1905;332–3.
  2. Regan de Bere S, Nunn S. Towards a pedagogy for patient and public involvement in medical education. Medical Teacher. 2016:50;79-92.

A summary from, Emma Murphy, IPHE contributor on her involvement.

Emma has volunteered to give a presentation to students on the MPharm and Genomic Medicine Programmes on her own experiences as well has been involved in the development of a number of case study scenarios. Here is a summary of her involvement:

Emma Murphy

Questions and responses

Q: Tell me about your personal motivation for becoming involved with our College network?

A: Before joining the IPHE network, I had previously presented a teaching session to students on the MSc Genomic Medicine Programme at the University of Birmingham. When the IPHE network was established in the College, I was keen to become involved in the group to allow me to share my own experiences with healthcare services across various hospitals having a son with rare genetic condition along with multiple disabilities.

Q: Can you tell me about the specific IPHE activity that you have been involved in?

A: Since joining the group, I have been asked to deliver a teaching session to students on the Pharmacy programme to speak about the management of the medication that my son has to take, who has a rare genetic condition. During my presentation, I also discussed with the students the relationships with community pharmacists and the challenges, as a family, we encounter.

I have also been involved working with other IPHE contributors using my own experience to produce a case based scenario for use in Interprofessional learning. 

Q: What was it that appealed to you about being involved in the activity?

A: I currently teach in a special School so I have experience of delivering teaching sessions. I have also presented at a number of charity events and conferences about my son’s healthcare needs. I was therefore keen to share the challenges around my son’s needs to inform education and the training of healthcare students.

Q: Who were the key stakeholders you worked with and what training or briefing did you have prior to starting the activity?

A: I have also been working with other IPHE contributors to produce case based scenarios for use in Interprofessional learning. One of the scenarios we developed was based on my own experience.

Q: What did you feel your main contribution was to the activity? What specific skills or insight did you bring?

A: I have enjoyed sharing and voicing the experiences I have encountered. I feel that this has been a valuable opportunity to share with students studying in medical education. The view of a patient’s experience helps underpin and influence their future roles.

Q: If you could give one piece of advice to a contributor who was interested in being involved in this activity, what would it be?

A: I have enjoyed sharing my own experiences to help others!

Q: Are there any other thoughts or reflections on this activity that you would like to share with us?

A: I feel that I have made a valuable contribution in the education of future healthcare professionals.

Here is some feedback from Dr Christine Hirsch, Senior Lecturer in Clinical Pharmacy:

After hearing about Emma’s teaching session for the Genomic programme, I felt that our Year 2 pharmacy students would benefit from hearing Emma’s story. Emma shared her experiences of her interactions with healthcare professionals through narrative and illustrations, highlighting the challenges that our healthcare system can sometimes present for patients, in this case particularly in accessing special medication for children. Emma really brought learning to life for our students demonstrated the challenges facing families with similar complex needs.

Involving People in Healthcare Education – Acting as a lay member on panel for Trust Monitoring Visit

Trust Monitoring visits – why and what it involves?

The College of Medical and Dental Sciences is required to monitor the standards of the learning experience provided by the partner NHS Trusts to deliver undergraduate education for the MBChB Programme. In order to assist this process, the College visits every Trust on a two yearly rolling cycle.

As with all Higher Education provision, monitoring of delivery concerns the assurance of quality and standards but also enhancement and improvement of the student experience. The monitoring of the clinical placements through this process is a formal process and the reports that follow focus on recommendations and areas for improvement, including specifics of how to meet recommendations made and expected timelines.

The General Medical Council (GMC) published – Promoting Excellence: standards for education and training in January 2016 and the documentation and visit questions will reflect the themes noted in these standards.

The monitoring team panel that visit the Trusts normally include a number of senior level College staff with responsibility for Medical Education and include a student representative and a lay member. 

The GMC refer to ‘lay’ as someone who is not medically qualified and suggest that involvement in sought of lay individuals with relevant expertise. This ensures that lay people can bring a valuable alternative perspective to a discussion or a decision making process. This could be a (possibly recently retired) non-medical healthcare professional, a teacher, a bio-scientist, an educationalist and so on, but people from many other walks of life, unconnected with health or education may be equally appropriate.

During the monitoring visit, the panel team will meet with senior members of the Trust and those involved in the placement education teaching of students. The panel will also meet with a group of students.

Ahead of the monitoring visit, the Trust will be asked to complete a self-evaluation document along with supporting evidence, which will form a starting point for the discussions at the visit.

Following the visit a written statement of outcomes with any recommendations and actions required.

A summary from Yvonne Gateley, IPHE Contributor

Yvonne has volunteered to be involved as a ‘lay’ panel member on some of our Trust monitoring visits.

Here is a summary of her involvement based on a series of questions we asked.

Yvonne Gateley

Questions and responses

Q: Tell me about your personal motivation for becoming involved with our College network?

A: I have a family interest in Medicine – my daughter trained as a doctor at the University of Bristol. I was previously involved in Adult Education, assessing, supporting and providing training on Specific Learning Difficulties. Prior to joining the group, I had been working with the ISU team in the College providing support for failing specialty trainees in the West Midlands Deanery. After becoming a member of the IPHE network group in the College, I expressed an interest in becoming a lay member on the Trust Monitoring visits for the MBChB programme. Has a layperson, I wanted to use my experience and skills and put them to good use.

Q: Can you tell me about the specific IPHE activity that you have been involved in?

A: I have since attended a number of Trust Monitoring visits for the MBChB programme has a lay member.

Q: What was it that appealed to you about being involved in the activity?

A: Having an interest in education, I wanted to gain further insight in placement education from the student’s point of view.

Q: Who were the key stakeholders you worked with and what training or briefing did you have prior to starting the activity?

A: Ahead of the Trust Monitoring visit, I was invited to a briefing meeting. The whole process was explained fully to me and how I would be involved as a panel member.

Q: What did you feel your main contribution was to the activity? What specific skills or insight did you bring?

A: I was able to put my experience to good use. Being NHS aware, as well as having a healthcare educational background, provided clear insight. I felt that I had the qualities to contribute as lay panel member.

Q: If you could give one piece of advice to a contributor who was interested in being involved in this activity, what would it be?

A: I was fully prepared ahead of each visit. Reading the paperwork and reviewing student placement evaluations allowed me to gain insight, on their learning experience, ahead of meeting with them during the visit. There may be questions to ask the students about their experience whilst on placement. A good layperson needs to be fully aware and familiarise ahead of the visit! It’s not just about attending the visit, preparation is very important.

Q: Are there any other thoughts or reflections on this activity that you would like to share with us?

A: It is very rewarding and worthwhile attending these visits as a lay member. I was curious to learn about the process of student learning around medical education.

It is an opportunity to reflect on the educational experience and have more of an understanding of student perspectives.

Feedback from the Professor John Skelton, Quality Lead for MBChB Programme, who chaired the monitoring visits

Yvonne has been a great success - she is familiar with education, familiar with the challenges which hospitals face, and is able to engage with hospital colleagues and students at all levels, up to and including the hospital executive.

The specific value such a person can bring is that they are "lay" (Yvonne works neither for a hospital nor for a University), and yet sufficiently familiar with the workplace, and sufficiently shrewd, to understand them.