Birmingham Rheumatology Research Patient Partnership (R2P2)

R2P2 group

We believe that patients should have a say in research that is potentially for their benefit.


The Birmingham Rheumatology Research Patient Partnership (R2P2) is a group of patients who are actively involved in the work of the Rheumatology Research Group in the Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, University of Birmingham. R2P2 members advise our researchers about what research we should do, how we should go about it and how we can share it with the public.

Below you will find links to relevant information about R2P2 and the work that R2P2 contributes to. If you are interested in joining and becoming a patient research partner, please contact Becky Birch.

An interview with an R2P2 patient research partner, talking about her experiences of being involved with rheumatology research

Find out more about the Birmingham Rheumatology Research Patient Partnership

Being an R2P2 patient research partner in COVID-19 times

Yes things have had to change, but research has not stopped completely and indeed many projects have started up again. So input from patient research partners is still very much needed and patient research partners are still very much involved in research projects and grant applications. In addition, after a successful pilot we have also expanded the Student Patient Alliance to include more students, so patient research partners can also get involved with that.

It is important to note that for the time being any involvement will be through online/ telephone meetings and emails only, so you won’t be asked to attend in person meetings.

Unfortunately, we were also not able to have an annual meeting this year, we are hoping it is back on next year! In the meantime, we are hoping that the website and emails from the R2P2 coordinators with news and updates will keep you in the loop of what is going on!

Latest news and updates

We have successfully delivered a case study for the IMI PREFER project!

The results of this study are now being used in international recommendations on how and when information about patient preferences should inform decision-making during the development and regulation of new treatments.

The case study builds on our previous studies of the preferences of people at risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for treatments to prevent or delay the development of RA.

A summary of the case study findings has been developed with our patient research partners.

An international team of 8 patient research partners, including several R2P2 partners have made a huge contribution to all aspects of this study, including:

  • The study objectives
  • The way that people were invited to take part in the study
  • The information given to people taking part in the study
  • A focus group discussion guide
  • Interpretating and reporting focus group findings
  • The content and design of an online survey
  • The summary of our findings for study participants and the general public
  • Writing the IMI PREFER recommendations on patient involvement in studies of patient preferences
  • Thank you to them all for their valuable input, which has enhanced the relevance, efficiency and quality of this important study.

    Researcher shares the importance of working with patient research partners to get to the heart of the research question

    Dr Amy Naylor is a Senior Research Fellow and member of the Rheumatology Research Group within the Institute of Inflammation and Ageing. Her research group studies the bone remodelling process to identify aspects that can be targeted therapeutically to reverse the bone loss seen as a result of inflammation and ageing and have found patient research partners (PRPs) invaluable.

    View the full article.

    People with rheumatoid arthritis are less likely to take part in clinical research studies than before the pandemic.

    A survey by the Versus Arthritis funded Research into Inflammatory Arthritis Centre (RACE) has shown that people with rheumatoid arthritis are less likely to take part in clinical research whilst COVID-19 is present in the community than they were before the pandemic. Over 1000 people with rheumatoid arthritis completed the online survey, which was distributed to members of the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS). The full study report has been published and is available online.

    Respondents highlighted some concerns about taking part in research, and suggested ways to improve recruitment at the moment. These included providing information about safety precautions, scheduling clinic visits for quiet times of day or at non‐hospital sites and avoiding the need to use public transport.

    Some respondents described the benefits of taking part in research, and the potential to improve the lives of people affected by rheumatoid arthritis in future.

    RACE is a Versus Arthritis funded research partnership between the universities of Glasgow, Birmingham, Newcastle and Oxford. The four centres are world leaders in rheumatology research and have joined together to achieve their aim of understanding the causes of inflammatory arthritis and developing better treatments for it. To do this, it is essential to carry out clinical research studies with rheumatology patients. You can find out more about RACE here.

    If you have rheumatoid arthritis and are interested in taking part in research, ask your rheumatology team about the studies going on at your hospital.

    People with rheumatoid arthritis are less likely to take part in clinical research studies than before the pandemic.

    The Pandemic and clinical trials: A recent survey conducted by the Versus Arthritis funded Research into Inflammatory Arthritis Centre (RACE) has shown that people with rheumatoid arthritis are less likely to take part in clinical research whilst COVID-19 is present in the community than they were before the pandemic.

    The RACE patient research partners, including one of our very own R2P2 members, contributed to the survey design and were authors on the paper describing this important research. Read more about the study.

    See past news and updates.

Latest Tweets