Sensing

Albrecht Group: Electrochemical and resistive-pulse sensors

Overview

We are interested in different sensor concepts from electrochemical small-molecule sensing to single-molecule detection of proteins and DNA using nanopores and nanopipettes, and furthermore specialise in advanced data analysis, unsupervised data classification and Deep Learning.

Categories: methodology; platforms; data

Barendt Group: Photoactive supramolecular assemblies and mechanically interlocked molecules for sensing

Overview

We are interested in machine learning techniques for classifying colloidal crystal structures as well as recognising patterns in seemingly disordered soft materials susceptible to thermal fluctuations.

Categories: probes; materials

Britton Group: In situ chemical visualisation and quantification by magnetic resonance imaging

Overview

We develop and apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to visualise chemical processes and environments across a diverse range of applications including batteries, corrosion, electrochemical surface finishing, consumer products, porous media, chemical engineering and biomedical systems. We specialise in the visualisation of electrochemical processes, chemistry in flow, surfactant systems and the development of novel MRI contrast agents.

Categories: methodology; data; probes

Gupta Group: Optical sensing

Overview

We are developing label-free optical methods and technologies for sensing of chemical and biological analytes. Hydrogels and biconjugation approaches are key to the development of these methods/ technologies. The raw output of these sensors is in the form of images, which are processed in real-time for continuous monitoring of the concentration of analytes.

Categories: probes; platforms

Herten Group: New tools for understanding protein interactions on the molecular scale

Overview

We are using single-molecule and super-resolution approaches to generate 3D representations of protein and membrane networks. Using novel probes for chemically induced dimerisation (CID) we want to interrogate protein-protein interactions in live-cell experiments to improve our understanding of receptor signalling cascades e.g. in T-cell signalling. 

Categories: probes; platforms

Neely Group: New tools for understanding genomes

Overview

We develop novel chemistry that allow us to tag specific genomic sequences. We are using these chemistries in imaging DNA sequence (DNA mapping), in nanopore sequencing experiments and as a way to better understand the epigenome. We predominantly use fluorescence microscopy as a means to image genome sequence, modifications and genome structure to complement state-of-the-art sequencing experiments.

Categories: probes; platforms; data

O’Reilly Group: Environment-sensitive fluorescent probes

Overview

We develop small molecule fluorescent probes capable of reporting on their local environment with high sensitivity. The dyes are highly modular and easy to functionalise, and their fluorescent properties can be precisely tuned over a broad wavelength range. We use these dyes in a range of applications, from the investigation of fundamental self-assembly processes through to fluorescent barcoding of live cells.

Categories: probes; materials

Pike Group: New Conformational Probes for Foldamers

Our research interests in this area are primarily concerned with the development of new spectroscopic probes for investigating the conformational behaviour of helical oligomers.

Categories: probes; platforms

Preece Group and Chromatwist Ltd. : novel fluorophores to the healthcare sector for bio-imaging

Overview

Prof Jon Preece and Dr Alex Robinson have created a spin-out company to use novel fluorophores discovered in their groups to be used in bio-imaging applications. These fluorophores are being tagged to biological entities to enable imaging. For example, tagging antibodies that recognise specific cell-recognition motifs for use in flow cytometry for counting and sorting of cells.

Categories: probes

Tucker Group: Sensing Nucleic Acids

Overview

We work on developing optical and electrochemical sensors for RNA/DNA biomarkers, including single point mutations in target sequences.

Categories: probes; assay platform development

Yeung Group: Formation, organisation and response of materials

Overview

The Yeung group uses in situ X-ray crystallography to investigate how the structures of molecular crystals and metal–organic frameworks respond to external stimuli, such as pressure, temperature, VOCs and electric fields.

Categories: materials